Second Generation Nissan Xterra Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
on line
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When ever i drive a different car the brakes always feel more stiff, then i get back in the x and the breaks feel very soft. I like the breaks on the x, but is this normal? I've heard stories about the brakes on x's being squishy... is it just the nature of the beast?
 

·
on line
Joined
·
152 Posts
yea i was worried about the squishy brakes when i bought it. I was use to a very stiff pedal feel from my car and i couldn't get use to it during the test drive. Now I dont mind it at all and the brakes work great. Its normal.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ok thats what i figured. I actually prefer the softer breaks.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
18 Posts
I read a lot of complaints about the brakes being "squishy" in reviews, but I never noticed it or felt it was lacking for me.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
I've got to say... my brakes were noticeably firmer after I installed front and rear braided stainless steel lines. If anybody is looking to improve the feel of their brakes that might be a good way to start.

If somebody who is running 17 or 18" wheels has some extra cash lying around I sure would like to read a review of Stillen's big brake kit... :laughing6:
 

·
on line
Joined
·
15,651 Posts
I have not changed the front, but doing the rear stainless braided lines did nothing to the feel of the pedal.

I think it has more to do with the brake booster than the calipers them selves.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Muzikman said:
I have not changed the front, but doing the rear stainless braided lines did nothing to the feel of the pedal.

I think it has more to do with the brake booster than the calipers them selves.
Admittedly, I did my fronts about a week or two before I did my rear. I felt a difference right after installing the fronts.

It definitely didn't make a huge difference, but it was noticeable. That's why I referred to it as a "good way to start.'"
 

·
on line
Joined
·
3,285 Posts
I agree with Muzikman. Unless your old hoses were leaking there shouldn't be any performance improvement in the brake system. Of course, if there was air trapped in the lines and/or low fluid before the new hoses were installed, then I could understand how a performance improvement could be felt.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
AZ-Ted said:
I agree with Muzikman. Unless your old hoses were leaking there shouldn't be any performance improvement in the brake system. Of course, if there was air trapped in the lines and/or low fluid before the new hoses were installed, then I could understand how a performance improvement could be felt.
I guess my first question would be, do you have them?

Again, I don't want to impress upon anyone that these made a night and day difference in my braking system. They didn't. But they did help a little bit, at least the fronts more so than the rears, and it was definitely noticeable.

Here is some Q&A info from a motorsports company consultant that you can find on stoptech's website (if you're interested);

I understand the protection benefit, but can you explain the reduced expansion benefit?
Any time that an object is subjected to internal pressure, it expands. The amount of expansion will be proportional to the amount of pressure present and the rigidity of the holding structure. In the case of brake hoses, we are subjecting Teflon to internal pressures as high as 3000PSI. Because the Teflon is relatively flexible (which makes it ideal for the job in one regard), it will expand under these conditions. This expansion creates additional fluid volume in the hydraulic circuit which is felt by the driver as a soft or mushy pedal.

Rubber overmolding does little to reduce expansion under pressure, as rubber is also a relatively flexible material. A woven braid of Stainless Steel, however, can greatly increase the rigidity of the hose under pressure while still allowing adequate flexibility for wheel end movement. In many cases, this reduced expansion can be felt by the driver as a firmer or more responsive brake pedal.

In addition, the reduced compliance will result in a faster transient response of the brake system. In other words, the time from the driver hitting the brake pedal until deceleration is generated will be decreased by a small amount. The benefit will vary based on each individual application, but in general overall deceleration can be attained more quickly, resulting in slightly shorter stopping distances.

What impacts will SS lines have on my vehicle's P-T (pressure vs. torque) relationship?
None. Because brake lines and hoses do not affect the torque generated at the wheel end, the P-T relationship remains unchanged when SS lines are installed. Only changes to a vehicle's caliper, rotor, or brake pad coefficient of friction will impact the P-T relationship.

Well then, will SS lines impact my vehicle's P-V (pressure vs. volume) relationship?
Absolutely. Because SS lines are much less compliant than their OEM counterparts, the P-V relationship will be reduced to some degree (less volume will be required at a given pressure). This is exactly the reason that a car equipped with SS lines has a firmer brake pedal.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
18 Posts
I think Oregon is right. As we all know, rubber is more flexible whereas steel is stiff. When you hit the brakes and pressure up that fluid, you better believe those lines will expand. Steel lines should lead to reduced pedal travel.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top