Second Generation Nissan Xterra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Nearly doubles suspension travel vs. stock.
increases track width by 3" per side
increases max lift height from almost 3" to >4"

If you swap the diff as well it adds strength, makes aftermarket gear ratios available.

Costs between $2500 and $5000 depending.


You really are having issues if you can't find TS info on this site...
:violent3:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
Well...if you drive a Titan then yes, you are right, it's pretty much already done. OR! If you already did a titan swap then yes it's mostly done.

If you are driving an offroad then you are still driving an Xterra.

A titan swap can consist of a full suspension swap (the one thing you are right on is that yes, it mostly consists of the front suspension, but then you have to match the rear) plus, if you so choose, a differential swap. Driving an offroad package does NOT complete the package. I really don't know how to answer your "questions".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,368 Posts
and since i have the off road package its already kinda done?
Not exactly. The off road models have a stronger rear diff, the front is the same on all trim levels.

If your not going to wheel your rig hard I wouldn't worry about it. In my opinion the swap is perfect for rigs that will see a lot of off road and difficult wheeling, the kind where you are running big lifts, tires several sizes larger than stock, a lot of heavy armor, and intend to make it or break it.

Most stockish Xterra's are best suited for moderate wheeling. The design of the Xterra brings a compromise between a comfortable road vehicle and a capable, but not solely dedicated, off road vehicle. If you don't do anything stupid, you probably won't break the front diff, I think those that have broken one either wheeled it hard and often, or created high stress situations on their drivetrain. (Bouncing the front end trying to climb an obstacle, gunning it with the front wheels bound up, etc...)

A cool head and a calm foot on the skinny pedal and your Xterra should be quite reliable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,953 Posts
The only thing that makes a T-swap "easier" in an automatic offroad or pro4x model is it has the same gear ratio that you can get an M205 in. All it does is save time/effort/$ in not having to regear or swap the rear axle also.

If you T-swap the suspension and stick with the R180 in the front (and run longer custom front axle shafts), then it makes absolutely no difference what model of xterra you have since no re-gearing is required (you are not replacing the front diff)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,806 Posts
Not exactly. The off road models have a stronger rear diff, the front is the same on all trim levels.

If your not going to wheel your rig hard I wouldn't worry about it. In my opinion the swap is perfect for rigs that will see a lot of off road and difficult wheeling, the kind where you are running big lifts, tires several sizes larger than stock, a lot of heavy armor, and intend to make it or break it.

Most stockish Xterra's are best suited for moderate wheeling. The design of the Xterra brings a compromise between a comfortable road vehicle and a capable, but not solely dedicated, off road vehicle. If you don't do anything stupid, you probably won't break the front diff, I think those that have broken one either wheeled it hard and often, or created high stress situations on their drivetrain. (Bouncing the front end trying to climb an obstacle, gunning it with the front wheels bound up, etc...)

A cool head and a calm foot on the skinny pedal and your Xterra should be quite reliable.

There is nothing proving the rear diff is stronger on a off-road model. The only difference is the locker.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
Well it is an inch bigger... 200mm compared to 226mm... Usually bigger=stronger when it comes to rear diffs...
Usually, that's true. But I wonder if the C200 diff is strong "enough" and it wouldn't make a difference in reliability going to the M226. I don't know.

I haven't read a lot about rear diff failures on either one...

As far as the R180 diff, I think people would agree that the weak link can be eliminated with a lunchbox locker, since the spider gears are the weak link in that diff... Once that's done, what's the next weak link? The axle shafts? If so, how much more beefy are the M205 shafts?

I'm still looking into the future myself and have been contemplating the TS if I feel the R180/Lokka diff I have will not be a grenade waiting to explode. I really don't want to go through the hassle of swapping in the M205 and re-gear the rear diff...
 

·
on line
Joined
·
10,980 Posts
Usually, that's true. But I wonder if the C200 diff is strong "enough" and it wouldn't make a difference in reliability going to the M226. I don't know.

I haven't read a lot about rear diff failures on either one...
Agreed ... and the failures you do hear about are usually the early e-locked m226s that only had two spider gears. Or the seals on some of the m226s, but that's not related to a load condition or 'strength' ... and there's a TSB now. I think for how most use these trucks, either the c200k or the m226 is a fine choice of axle ... it wouldn't be at the top of my list of considerations if selecting a base vehicle to start a new ground-up build.

As far as the R180 diff, I think people would agree that the weak link can be eliminated with a lunchbox locker, since the spider gears are the weak link in that diff... Once that's done, what's the next weak link? The axle shafts? If so, how much more beefy are the M205 shafts?
I think so, yes ... the axle shafts are the next weak link after the center spider gears, possibly followed by the DS u-joints after that.

When the r180 locker (ARB) came out, we started seeing folks popping their front half-shaft assemblies; usually at the diff-side stub shaft. So now RCV sells replacements ... or at least Rugged Rocks is pursuing getting them to market. But you've gotta pay to play, there ... will likely come in at four figures for a set. I'm guessing that, since we're now going into the first real wheeling season since the m205 ARB was released, that we'll start seeing what the next weak link for it will be ... though I don't think you'd get much argument about the m205 spiders being stronger than the r180a spiders ... I do think they're still the first weak link, though. Most catastrophic m205 failures I have seen (there have been a few) were the same failure mode as the catastrophic r180a failures we're all familiar with.

I'd like to see someone compare the (stock) m205 and r180a half axle assemblies and put together a semi-real and somewhat unbiased failure analysis ... it'd be an interesting exercise and I'm not sure which would come out on top.

The other good point of comparison would be to take a look at the respective internal side-shafts of each diff assembly ... I haven't heard of anyone breaking one from either diff, but I suppose you might break one if you had beefy half-axles and a front locker. Similar to when front spiders let go, that'd be a sh!tty day if you had to make that trail repair ... but maybe not so bad as the spiders, now that I think about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
Agreed ... and the failures you do hear about are usually the early e-locked m226s that only had two spider gears. Or the seals on some of the m226s, but that's not related to a load condition or 'strength' ... and there's a TSB now. I think for how most use these trucks, either the c200k or the m226 is a fine choice of axle ... it wouldn't be at the top of my list of considerations if selecting a base vehicle to start a new ground-up build.

I think so, yes ... the axle shafts are the next weak link after the center spider gears, possibly followed by the DS u-joints after that.

When the r180 locker (ARB) came out, we started seeing folks popping their front half-shaft assemblies; usually at the diff-side stub shaft. So now RCV sells replacements ... or at least Rugged Rocks is pursuing getting them to market. But you've gotta pay to play, there ... will likely come in at four figures for a set. I'm guessing that, since we're now going into the first real wheeling season since the m205 ARB was released, that we'll start seeing what the next weak link for it will be ... though I don't think you'd get much argument about the m205 spiders being stronger than the r180a spiders ... I do think they're still the first weak link, though. Most catastrophic m205 failures I have seen (there have been a few) were the same failure mode as the catastrophic r180a failures we're all familiar with.

I'd like to see someone compare the (stock) m205 and r180a half axle assemblies and put together a semi-real and somewhat unbiased failure analysis ... it'd be an interesting exercise and I'm not sure which would come out on top.

The other good point of comparison would be to take a look at the respective internal side-shafts of each diff assembly ... I haven't heard of anyone breaking one from either diff, but I suppose you might break one if you had beefy half-axles and a front locker. Similar to when front spiders let go, that'd be a sh!tty day if you had to make that trail repair ... but maybe not so bad as the spiders, now that I think about it.
I'm getting close to doing my TS (waiting on UCAs - couple weeks out). Going from a locked r180 to a locked m205. I'm very hopeful that the weak link will continue to be the CV - that's a much easier trailside fix than just about anything else (especially on m205 with titan cv since they bolt on).

Because of this, I will never purposefully purchase burlier CVs. If at some point I get crazy enough to break something (which I doubt) - that's exactly where I want to break. And it's why I carry a spare CV on the trail.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top