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I was wondering...................dudes blowing diffs for one reason or another, i had a thought. Im not thinking everyone here that wheels knows to do this................But Jason, Muzikman had told me when i was on a run with him that when going down a steep hill that i can down shift into 3rd, 2nd or 1st gear(i have an automatic) so i can save my breaks, the lower gears thus slowing the vihicle down with out breaking.


Now when you go up a hill, steep hill climbs ect, im wondering if some of you know to shift into a lower gear again. You get better results instead of just keeping it in D and hitting the gas. Its how i wheel and ahs worked well. Again, i know this may be just one of those things all you guys already know. But there has to be someone out there that doesnt know to do this stuff. And i dont recall ever seeing any threads on the topic.
 

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Well for all of the Manual guys... this goes without saying. But for some of the Automatic guys im sure that they didnt know this. Good point to post it up!

You get a B for effort... and Muzikman gets an A. :drunken: :drunken:
 

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Hey, I can only teach you so much in one day. :)

Picking the gear to climb a hill is more about experiance than a hard set rule. If you want to crawl up a hill and try and keep the wheel spin down, you will want to use a lower gear. When in a lower gear the the wheels will not spin as fast at the same RPM's as a higher gear. And because our peek torque is in the higher RPMs, using a lower gear also gives you more power behind the wheels.

In an automatic what you will find is that in D, as you are climbing a hill and your tires start to break loose, the tranny will think you are just moving faster and upshift you. This just causes your tires to spin faster and not really help you up the hill (unless really fast tire spin is what you are looking for).

If you remember that rock ledge that I climbed when we were at Connellsville, I did that in 2nd gear. If you remember at the playground that short but steep hill I climbed, I was in 1st.
 

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From Fourwheeler Mag-
Electronic traction enhancements have recently become much more applicable to real-world off-highway driving, and the Xterra Offroad is clearly up to date. There is four-wheel limited slip, in which wheelspin is controlled by braking any single wheel that loses traction. In addition, there is an electronically selectable locker in the rear axle. Hill Descent Control (HDC), which keeps downhill rolling speeds controllable, can be switched off, and speed is selectable by using the accelerator pedal. In low-range, revised throttle mapping enables much more careful progress with less surging when crawling is required. And Hill Start Assist (HSA) holds the vehicle in place on a hill start without rolling back for up to two seconds, monitoring the driver's pedal input to permit smooth advancement from a stalled position in tricky situations.
YEEAAHHH low range throttle mapping!! :cheers:
 

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The only problem with that is, once the computer detects that you want to go fast, it lets you (withink reason). Perfect example is if you are on a flat trail in 4lo. Give it gas and it will feel real slugish, but then at about 10mph you'll feel it kick off and you'll get the power back (though because you are still in 4lo the gearing is still low).

So, if you are starting out on a hill, 4lo will prevent you from spinning tire right away, but if you get on it, it will still let you spin tire with them best of them.

It's amazing how different wheeling the Jeep and the X are. It take a while on the trail to get use to which ever I am driving if I was wheeling the other previously.

DBAX said:
From Fourwheeler Mag-
Electronic traction enhancements have recently become much more applicable to real-world off-highway driving, and the Xterra Offroad is clearly up to date. There is four-wheel limited slip, in which wheelspin is controlled by braking any single wheel that loses traction. In addition, there is an electronically selectable locker in the rear axle. Hill Descent Control (HDC), which keeps downhill rolling speeds controllable, can be switched off, and speed is selectable by using the accelerator pedal. In low-range, revised throttle mapping enables much more careful progress with less surging when crawling is required. And Hill Start Assist (HSA) holds the vehicle in place on a hill start without rolling back for up to two seconds, monitoring the driver's pedal input to permit smooth advancement from a stalled position in tricky situations.
YEEAAHHH low range throttle mapping!! :cheers:
 

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Perfect example is if you are on a flat trail in 4lo.
LRTM is not made for going over 10 mph on flat trails, any more than HDC is for going uphill... It does help a whole lot on rocks though, and loose terrain. I know it doesn't provide torque like a gear reduction (TC), but it does limit wheelspin and provides smoother throttle tip-in until they make some.

It's amazing how different wheeling the Jeep and the X are.
I wish I had your problems. My Scout's still sitting in the garage.. :sleepy2:
 

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DBAX said:
Perfect example is if you are on a flat trail in 4lo.
LRTM is not made for going over 10 mph on flat trails, any more than HDC is for going uphill... It does help a whole lot on rocks though, and loose terrain. I know it doesn't provide torque like a gear reduction (TC), but it does limit wheelspin and provides smoother throttle tip-in until they make some.

It's amazing how different wheeling the Jeep and the X are.
I wish I had your problems. My Scout's still sitting in the garage.. :sleepy2:
Correct, but my point is, if you continue to spin, it will not throtle back, it will eventually let loose. This is why even in 4l0, you have to be easy on the gas for the ABLS do work at it's best.
 

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^ I agree and I'd like to point something else out as well. With the diff concerns we have, it should be mentioned that there is no need to modulate the brakes to engage the limited slip system as on a standard LSD vehicle. It's not humanly possible to out-perform the computer and actuators efforts (hundreds of pulses per second) in operating our ABLS system. If you do attempt this older school method on our truck, all you will be doing is introducing additional outboard resistance (at the brakes) for the diff to torque (or snap) against.
 

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If you do attempt this older school method on our truck, all you will be doing is introducing additional outboard resistance (at the brakes) for the diff to torque (or snap) against.
Are you saying this because the ABLS wont hold the brakes long enough for the diff to torque against since the ABLS is 'pulsing'?

Oh, and can we just call it the 'old school' method rather than 'older'? :D
 

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lloyd Swartz said:
Just assumed everyone was in 4low 1st. With a rear kocker and front LSD speed is rarely needed except for the most extreme hill....
I can't think of one "most extreme hill" I've come across that didn't require low speed and high torque...

Anything you can blast up isn't very "extreme"...
 

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I have encountered hills so extreme that even twin lockers, articulation and clearance were not enough. I think hills that require a little momentum while in low 1st or second are somewhat common.(cant crawl, like the hill I broke on)

For hills that require outright speed with the right equipment, those are extremely rare.(aside from sand of course) Despite my extensive wheeling experience I can only think of a few. The best example maybe is the far end of Isham canyon in death valley :bounce:
 
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