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Am going to keep a recovery strap in the X. What strength/weight rating should I carry? What length? A recommended brand? In the pickup the X replaced I just carried 20 feet of log chain with hooks on the ends. Don't want to carry that chain in the X.
 

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Chains are bad. I would look into the 3"x30' 30K ProComp strap. Also remember a strap with metal hooks are bad.
 

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Totall agree with Muzikman. If you watch over the next few weeks on the 4wheelparts website, they may throw one on for cheap. They have done that in the past. I have two Procomps and they are top notch.
 

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Chains are not bad. However, if you're someone who thinks chains are bad, then they aren't for you. You'd need a High-Lift Jack and you'd have to know how to use them correctly, safely, and efficiently. An effective "self-recovery"chain must be at least 3/8" thick by 20' long. I would personally prefer 3/4" by 30'. Chain and a High-Lift will let you recover your own vehicle, by yourself in many situations. However, for most off-roaders, a simple recovery strap is good enough.

I own these two and a tree strap:
Expeditionware Tow Strap (2"/30' / 20,000 pounds of load before breaking / working load limit of 7,000 pounds):

Kinetic Yanker Rope (30' long / 30,000 pounds before breaking / working load limit rating of 12,000 pounds):

Expeditionware Tree Strap (3"/30' / over 40,000 pounds before breaking / working limit of 15,000 pounds):


You're not going to need anything rated over 6,000lbs unless you happen to recover a lot of GMC Suburbans. However, having a 3" strap with a working limit of 12,000lbs, over a 2" strap and 7,000lbs never hurts. There is quite a price difference in the ratings though.

The yanker rope can be used in two ways. It can be used as a kinetic yanker or you can sailor-tie the rope and make a loop every 2 feet, turning it into a make-shift chain formation for self recovery with a High-Lift. It's not cheap though.

Here's another amazing device that revolutionised the off-road suvivalist racing community. It allows you to easily and reliably self-recover in ANY situation. I'm saving up for one.:


https://www.expeditionexchange.com/pullpal/

https://www.expeditionexchange.com/straps/
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You can also check out Tractor supply. I have a 15 K tree strap and a 20K lb tow strap, sorta overkill but that's me. I'd stick with the 15K lb at least You do need a tree strap and a tow strap. They are never long enough. go here http://www.4x4now.com/4wht.htm and teach yourself all you need to know. MC
 

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I had a Tractor supply one, i forget the rating but it was blue.
I used it 2 times and snapped! Looked like it was good condition,
but none the less it broke. So i got a new one at Wally world for
20 bucks and still going strong. I spent 30 for the one at TS
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Muzikman said:
For self recovery a chain isn't bad, but for vehicle to vehicle recovery it's down right dangerous.
I wouldn't use a chain for vehicle-vehicle. I hope I didn't give that impression. That would be just asking for damage.

And yes, usmc, all the products featured on Expedition Exchange are fabulous, just not very ecconomical. They also have very detailed information about every single product with tons of photos.

I have it set as my homepage for cryin out loud.
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Syndicate said:
The yanker rope can be used in two ways. It can be used as a kinetic yanker or you can sailor-tie the rope and make a loop every 2 feet, turning it into a make-shift chain formation for self recovery with a High-Lift. It's not cheap though.
How would that work, I would think it would stretch more than the hi-lift could move. This is the reason you are not supposed to use recovery straps with a hi-lift.
 

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You're mostly correct, although the yanker rope stops stretching after it reaches %130 of its orriginal length. It's not exactly a bungee cord. This method is pretty much a total pain in the ass and a last ditch attempt to self-recover, but it does work. The one time I've seen it done however, the knots were so tight after the rope was released that the guy could not untie them.

Basically you have multiple loops in the rope. As you reverse-jack the rope to pull the vehicle towards you, you have to go put rocks under the wheels each time you've completed a jack length. Repeat.
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Syndicate said:
You're mostly correct, although the yanker rope stops stretching after it reaches %130 of its orriginal length. It's not exactly a bungee cord. This method is pretty much a total pain in the ass and a last ditch attempt to self-recover, but it does work. The one time I've seen it done however, the knots were so tight after the rope was released that the guy could not untie them.

Basically you have multiple loops in the rope. As you reverse-jack the rope to pull the vehicle towards you, you have to go put rocks under the wheels each time you've completed a jack length. Repeat.
A chain with grab hooks sounds easier. So does a winch or following rule #1 of wheeling...never go alone. :)

They are nice ropes for vehicle to vehicle recovery though.
 

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Lol, obviously... Yeah, it's totally a last resort. Just one of those things where it's nice to know that if you were forced to you could do it.

I've never been a big fan of "rule #1" either. I like wheeling with others but I'm more geared for expedition-type wheeling, where you spend a week in the backcountry and cover 100+ miles. There's something about doing it alone that's highly rewarding.
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If you are doing a recovery with another vehicle I wouldn't use chains at all. I would only use a tow strap or yank strap rated at least 12 to 15k pounds. I have had a couple of the ones that I bought at Auto Zone as a last minute item and they are rated to something like a 10k pound break limit and they snapped. Unreal huh? I'd get someting with those above min rated ones or more. Also remember to put a blanket or towel over it to keep it on the ground if it was to snap. It might not be a winch cable but it'll leave a nasty mark if you get nailed by it and keep people back from the vehicles. I've seen a bunch of times where I've had to yell at people to get back because they were standing to close.
 

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:clown: --Having spent many years driving in the Sierras (snow)--

--during snow and ice driving, the YANK strap is the only way to unstick somebody and you need a minimum 20,000 rate on pull--

--especially when your driving a Manual transmission--

-- :geek: :geek: JIMBO
 

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I have the pro-comp, goes with me everywhere and fits in the compartment under the floor in the back nicely. Along with my shackle receiver and some other bits & bobs.
 
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