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If you have steel wheels, switch to alloys. Stick to 260s or 265s to save weight. The tune from my Bully Dog seems to help too. I get 16 to 18 mpg city and 18 to 20 hwy and I'm fully armored and lifted on 285s. No offset on the wheels helps. Keep things off your rack too.
 

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^ What he said. Your moving a brick down the road, so rolling resistance and air resistance is key. Keep your tires aired up. If you really care about mpg then highway tires are about 1mpg better than even mild all terrains. Obviously keeping your speed in check helps.

The only thing I would disagree with is the alloy wheels - the factory alloys are only about a pound or two less than the steel wheel so it really isn't that big a deal. Maybe aftermarket alloys are less?
 

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I was just wondering the ways that I could go about modifying my X to get better MPG OR even a little bit more power.
Keep your rpm's below 2200 or even better, 2000. RPMs use fuel.
Coast as far as possible with every stop.
Asking about more power and better mpg's in the same question raises some concerns.
 

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Rotational mass takes power to turn. Pick up the lightest wheel/tire combo you can find. Have an ultra-light weight driveshaft made (I've seen the as little as 4 pounds, supporting 650 horse power). Find an underdrive pulley. I'm sure someone makes one.

Now for the aerodynamics of our rolling box... A few factors go into play here, and I could go down this rabbit hole for days. We have a lot of parasitic drag with the roof rack and mirrors and stuff, not to mention the induced drag of an aerodynamically inefficient body shape. Basically, take the roof rack off and put a line of vortex generators across the hump on the roof. Finding air to fill in the enormous drag pocket behind the hatch is a challenge, but if that puzzle can be solved, it would make the biggest difference (from an aerodynamics standpoint). Also, lower the truck. Less air underneath means smoother airflow.

OR... you can just make sure that your truck is in tip-top shape, be easy on the go-pedal, and keep it under 65mph (the speed where aero begins to have a noticeable effect).
 

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Hey there!

I was just wondering the ways that I could go about modifying my X to get better MPG OR even a little bit more power. Thanks!
If you're just concerned about maximizing your mpgs to make you feel better, do what everyone has said. If you're doing it to save money at the pump, don't bother. You could easily spend hundreds of dollars on little things to save mpg's, but you'd be spending that money to gain maybe a few $ each fill up. Would it be worth it to me to downsize to 260's, drive like my grandma, take forever to get up to highway speeds just to save (let's be generous) maybe $3/fill up? Hell no.

Slowing your acceleration down, keep your rpm's below 2k (if you can) and keeping your fluids clean and changed are your best bangs for your bucks
 

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Rotational mass takes power to turn. Pick up the lightest wheel/tire combo you can find. Have an ultra-light weight driveshaft made (I've seen the as little as 4 pounds, supporting 650 horse power). Find an underdrive pulley. I'm sure someone makes one.

Now for the aerodynamics of our rolling box... A few factors go into play here, and I could go down this rabbit hole for days. We have a lot of parasitic drag with the roof rack and mirrors and stuff, not to mention the induced drag of an aerodynamically inefficient body shape. Basically, take the roof rack off and put a line of vortex generators across the hump on the roof. Finding air to fill in the enormous drag pocket behind the hatch is a challenge, but if that puzzle can be solved, it would make the biggest difference (from an aerodynamics standpoint). Also, lower the truck. Less air underneath means smoother airflow.

OR... you can just make sure that your truck is in tip-top shape, be easy on the go-pedal, and keep it under 65mph (the speed where aero begins to have a noticeable effect).
I've joked about fabricating some of those aerodynamic panels that most of the semi-trucks are using now to get better mpg. That said, in my case keep it under 75 and go easy on the pedal makes the biggest difference.
 

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^ What he said. Your moving a brick down the road, so rolling resistance and air resistance is key. Keep your tires aired up. If you really care about mpg then highway tires are about 1mpg better than even mild all terrains. Obviously keeping your speed in check helps.

The only thing I would disagree with is the alloy wheels - the factory alloys are only about a pound or two less than the steel wheel so it really isn't that big a deal. Maybe aftermarket alloys are less?
Are you sure? I think the steel is almost double the weight of the alloys.
i got an extra alloy for a spare and just picking up the steel and then the alloy, damn the alloys were way lighter
 

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Registered - From Westminster, CA, USA
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If you're just concerned about maximizing your mpgs to make you feel better, do what everyone has said. If you're doing it to save money at the pump, don't bother. You could easily spend hundreds of dollars on little things to save mpg's, but you'd be spending that money to gain maybe a few $ each fill up. Would it be worth it to me to downsize to 260's, drive like my grandma, take forever to get up to highway speeds just to save (let's be generous) maybe $3/fill up? Hell no.

Slowing your acceleration down, keep your rpm's below 2k (if you can) and keeping your fluids clean and changed are your best bangs for your bucks
There’s a difference in my mpg driving 80+ vs 65-70. I’d say I can save a gallon and a half to 2 gallons commuting while driving slower
 

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Are you sure? I think the steel is almost double the weight of the alloys.
i got an extra alloy for a spare and just picking up the steel and then the alloy, damn the alloys were way lighter
I stand corrected - I knew someone here weighed them - there 10lbs difference each - which is enough to matter:

 

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How much of a difference does a Yakima load warrior rack make? I got one really cheap awhile back and was considering putting on. Curious what kind of damage it would to my mileage.
Anything that sticks up above your factory rails is going to impact your mileage. If you need a rack, I'd suggest putting it on when you need to use it, but taking it off the rest of the time especially for commuting.
 

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To save fuel, the X is equipped with
  • no lift,
  • 4 season tires with low rolling resistance, and filled with
  • extended performance synthetic motor oil

Regular, pro-active maintenance helps.

I overinflate the tires by one pound to 36 lb., sometimes higher if fully loaded.

This summer I slowed down by 10 km/h on the highway to roughly 101-102 km/h. That helps. Driving slower on roads that wind through hills and mountains reduces stress.
 

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I do know, that when I went to trade in my 2015 6MT Pro-4X, I removed all my aftermarket engine parts to sell separately. When I removed the Cold Air Intake and Intake manifold spacer, I immediately lost 2-3 MPG running the stock airbox and no spacer. I was getting consistent 18-20 MPG HWY/City prior to trading it in. I drove it bone stock for a couple weeks waiting on my new truck to be delivered and couldn't get back what I lost mileage wise with those parts. I lost a lot of low end torque. Just sayin'....
 

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I do know, that when I went to trade in my 2015 6MT Pro-4X, I removed all my aftermarket engine parts to sell separately. When I removed the Cold Air Intake and Intake manifold spacer, I immediately lost 2-3 MPG running the stock airbox and no spacer. I was getting consistent 18-20 MPG HWY/City prior to trading it in. I drove it bone stock for a couple weeks waiting on my new truck to be delivered and couldn't get back what I lost mileage wise with those parts. I lost a lot of low end torque. Just sayin'....
I never said there wasn't....?
ok? I did
 

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Are you sure? I think the steel is almost double the weight of the alloys.
i got an extra alloy for a spare and just picking up the steel and then the alloy, damn the alloys were way lighter
Yep, so maybe picking up a stick alloy wheel from a junk yard/Craigslist/ebay may help to save 10lbs of extra weight.

As some of you noted here, one may spend way more $$$ on making modifications to improve by 1-2mpg. If you're that concerned about mpg, trade the truck in for a 4-cyl car. Or be happy with current measures (tires inflated to 36 psi, keeping RPMs below 2,000, coast down hill, avoid abrupt acceleration/deceleration/acceleration cycles, reduce weight by keeping only the essentials in the truck, keep fluids in tip-top shape, etc).
 
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