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A Sven-Saw was mentioned in the first post but it's worth mentioning again for those not familiar with them. I don't know of a finer folding hand saw for the weight and space it takes up.







https://www.amazon.com/Sven-Saw-Original-21-Folding/dp/B00BI66XPQ


If you can find them “what-a-saw” is a modern take on a Sven and super awesome! I snatch them up when ever I see one and dole them out as presents to good friends


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The katana boy 500mm or 650 mm will go through wood like a hot knife through butter.
And skin,bone,cartilage etc...

If given as a present the recipient is indentured for 5 years of service to the giver...........

I'm just sayin...................
 

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The katana boy 500mm or 650 mm will go through wood like a hot knife through butter.
And skin,bone,cartilage etc...

If given as a present the recipient is indentured for 5 years of service to the giver...........

I'm just sayin...................
LOL

In all seriousness the Katana Boy 650 has much larger teeth than its little brother, the Katana Boy 500, it is estimated to cut through about 30% faster. The Sven Saw is nice, but you become limited to the depth of the cut itself. I have personally paired the Silky Katanaboy 650 with the Gomboy 240 in the same carrying case. Katanaboy is for rough and fast cuts, then the gomboy is used for limbing and finer cuts. We recently put both through the test in the desert. It was lots of fun.
 

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LOL

In all seriousness the Katana Boy 650 has much larger teeth than its little brother, the Katana Boy 500, it is estimated to cut through about 30% faster. The Sven Saw is nice, but you become limited to the depth of the cut itself. I have personally paired the Silky Katanaboy 650 with the Gomboy 240 in the same carrying case. Katanaboy is for rough and fast cuts, then the gomboy is used for limbing and finer cuts. We recently put both through the test in the desert. It was lots of fun.
It may have been me that recommended the Sven Saw earlier in the thread.
I still stand by that recommendation "for the money".

However, having seen how the Comboy and KatanaBoy 650 performed recently I am amazed at their abilities.
I am unclear as to what species LNXPenguin was cutting; but it was dryed low and slow in the desert and was as hard as any species I have ever been around. I couldn't pierce it with the point of a pocket knife.
[with some exertion ;) ] these saws went right through leaving behind a very smooth cut.
I would have not been able to duplicate that effort with my Sven Saw ... nor did I want to set down my scotch to do so. :D

The Comboy folds up nicely but may be just a bit heavier than my Sven Saw.

It was fun ... (watching).
 

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If things go totally bad on the trip and somebody has to be hauled out by air evac, they will really wish they had an insurance policy to cover a ride with the air ambulance folks. Most of the people I knew in Alaska had it, and IIRC, it wasn't that expensive. The bill for the chopper, the pilot, a flight nurse, etc for an hour flight (round trip) cost a friend over $50K 10 years ago. So get that insurance card to take along.
 

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I found the Lone Jeeper's website a really great resource. This dude wheels alone in BC, Yukon and Alaska so he's spent a lot of time compiling his kit to make sure he's self reliant. It's a great starting point to assemble your own kit. Some things are jeep specific, but broadly most of it carries over to any offroading:


- How and why reduce vehicle weight (if you weigh less you consume less gas and get stuck less often)
- how to organize your internal storage for longer trips
- minimal trail repair kit
- spare parts kit. It's interesting that crankshaft position sensor is mentioned for JKs, and tehre's a strongly worded recommendation to carry it as an X spare as well.
- recovery kit
- bug out bag, if you ever have to ditch your vehicle and travel on foot.

This has been very useful to me personally because it's all in one place. Take a look.
 

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I found the Lone Jeeper's website a really great resource. This dude wheels alone in BC, Yukon and Alaska so he's spent a lot of time compiling his kit to make sure he's self reliant. It's a great starting point to assemble your own kit. Some things are jeep specific, but broadly most of it carries over to any offroading:


- How and why reduce vehicle weight (if you weigh less you consume less gas and get stuck less often)
- how to organize your internal storage for longer trips
- minimal trail repair kit
- spare parts kit. It's interesting that crankshaft position sensor is mentioned for JKs, and tehre's a strongly worded recommendation to carry it as an X spare as well.
- recovery kit
- bug out bag, if you ever have to ditch your vehicle and travel on foot.

This has been very useful to me personally because it's all in one place. Take a look.
Ton of good information here.....I always try to weigh new additions to my X on benefits vs. weight. I don't want to drive a tank!
 
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I found the Lone Jeeper's website a really great resource. This dude wheels alone in BC, Yukon and Alaska so he's spent a lot of time compiling his kit to make sure he's self reliant. It's a great starting point to assemble your own kit. Some things are jeep specific, but broadly most of it carries over to any offroading:


- How and why reduce vehicle weight (if you weigh less you consume less gas and get stuck less often)
- how to organize your internal storage for longer trips
- minimal trail repair kit
- spare parts kit. It's interesting that crankshaft position sensor is mentioned for JKs, and tehre's a strongly worded recommendation to carry it as an X spare as well.
- recovery kit
- bug out bag, if you ever have to ditch your vehicle and travel on foot.

This has been very useful to me personally because it's all in one place. Take a look.
There's some pretty good info on his page. I spent a bit reading around on it. This'll make good reading!
 

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It really was a good article - more focused on those who do light wheeling and overlanding than those who are hard-core wheeling. However, principles are certainly transferable.
 

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I have one of these little Wyoming saws tucked under my back seat with a small axe and shovel. It's come in handy a couple times to move some small branches out of the way and process a little fire wood around camp. I think they make a larger version of it but I liked how compactly it packs away. It's also easier to use than the regular folding saws I've tried in the past.

https://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com...ductDetail/Meat-Saws/prod9999009053/cat100823
 

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I found the Lone Jeeper's website a really great resource. This dude wheels alone in BC, Yukon and Alaska so he's spent a lot of time compiling his kit to make sure he's self reliant. It's a great starting point to assemble your own kit. Some things are jeep specific, but broadly most of it carries over to any offroading:


- How and why reduce vehicle weight (if you weigh less you consume less gas and get stuck less often)
- how to organize your internal storage for longer trips
- minimal trail repair kit
- spare parts kit. It's interesting that crankshaft position sensor is mentioned for JKs, and tehre's a strongly worded recommendation to carry it as an X spare as well.
- recovery kit
- bug out bag, if you ever have to ditch your vehicle and travel on foot.

This has been very useful to me personally because it's all in one place. Take a look.
This is cool! I was thinking the other day about how I find it handy that I prioritize my camping setup to be more suitable for motorcycle camping because it means that the load in my Xterra is that much lighter too. But I haven't yet put a lot of thought into an essential repair kit for it. This will definitely come in handy. Especially with an epic trip on the horizon.

I won't lie. I definitely consider camping out of the Xterra to be more along the lines of glamping considering the luxuries it can provide over motorcycle camping when it comes to the elements. But I still want to keep it as clutter free and light weight as possible. :p
 

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Motorcycle camping, to me, seems like it be similar to backpacking. Keep it light, small, and simple. I've not done it yet, mostly because we've got better set ups right now (M416 and an RTT, for one). Plus, up here in Mordor and the surrounding areas, the bugs suck. Badly. It's either mosquitoes or black flies and I hate both.
 

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When i first got the X my approach was that it can handle the weight and has the space so i kinda threw everything i could think of in the back even just for DD. and would load it up even more for camping. here lately i have been removing stuff that hasnt been used in the past 2 yr or seems unnecessary. I have significantly reduced the weight, and its easier to get to the stuff that is actually important.



That lone jeepers website is great and has a write up in why lighter is better.
 

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Motorcycle camping, to me, seems like it be similar to backpacking. Keep it light, small, and simple. I've not done it yet, mostly because we've got better set ups right now (M416 and an RTT, for one). Plus, up here in Mordor and the surrounding areas, the bugs suck. Badly. It's either mosquitoes or black flies and I hate both.
Very much so. But it depends heavily on your standards for comfort and what your priorities are (i.e., Quality of food; comfort of sleeping; hygiene, etc.). I don't require a lot, but most of the gear that I've picked up (tent, sleeping pad, bag, etc) is lightweight. If I really wanted to I could go ultralight, but I tend to compromise a bit for comfort and space - especially when I'm on the bike because of how physically taxing it is and how essential shelter, comfort and rest are at the end of the day. I get pretty grouchy if I don't sleep comfortably. But I could do without a 5 course meal as long as I have something hearty and balanced. So, I have a 2 person tent (and most moto-campers follow this guideline) that I use because I want the extra tent space for my helmet and gear so I don't have to worry about bugs moving in and the elements taking a toll. I may go that route in the future though. Especially as I start adding heavy external gear on my X.

I'm fairly mindful of the horsepower/weight ratios because it's a total drag feeling the bike bog when it's loaded with baggage. So I'm inherently mindful of it as I develop my vision for the Xterra. Even if it is more "capable" I still like to free up as much as possible. Hence my interest in this thread.
 

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I did the backpacking back in the day (parts of the AT, a 5 day trip through the Grand Canyon) so I've got all sorts of lightweight and small gear. Tiny little stove that's essentially a burner that attaches to the isobutane, very light tent, thermarest, and so forth. Some of this would be good for moto-camping. My fiance has a larger tent, but still likely not big enough for two and our gear. I've looked at the Atacama and could see going that route - mostly for the room inside, but the vestibule that'll hold either of our bikes is also nice, especially if the weather was inclement and we needed to do maintenance or repairs. My bike's an R1200GSA, so while I do feel the impact of extra weight, it really isn't all that bad. The thing's a torque monster.

However, right now we're still doing the CC camping. Our next trip is from here in Mordor down to the Outer Banks. All of 14 hours if we used the highway, but we're not. We'll do a shorter run to a hotel for the first part. Then start fresh on the 555, then later the Midland Trail. Scenic and curvy roads. Then a week on the beach in a rented house we're splitting with friends. This'll be our longest purely motorcycle trip, so it'll be fun figuring out what we do and don't need.
 
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Yup, that's the route. We'll be staying in Richmond that evening (right downtown so we can walk around, enjoy some good food, etc), then finishing with a relatively quick ride into the place we're staying the next day. A bit over 3 hours, from what I can see.
 

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Yup, that's the route. We'll be staying in Richmond that evening (right downtown so we can walk around, enjoy some good food, etc), then finishing with a relatively quick ride into the place we're staying the next day. A bit over 3 hours, from what I can see.
Give me a shout! There's a neat route from Richmond to Chesapeake and into OBX that we take every year.

If I'm around and you have the time, swing by and we'll grab lunch or something.
 

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I'll keep that in mind. With us, who knows how it'll go. She's very much spur of the moment on things like this, but if it works out I'm all for it.
 

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A fire fight while offroading? Seriously? Your advocacy for what amounts to an armed posse strikes me as a bit paranoid.
Seems like your being a bit irrational, "armed posse".

Have you ever seen a fire fight? I have. I've also seen where your ability to shoot accurately under pressure degrades as the stress ramps up. How many times have you seen police get into a fire fight? I've seen lots and one thing I've noticed is that one mag is never enough when your under stress. Try hitting a moving target with one shot. Not likely to happen.

I have noted that in many forums of off-roaders carrying weapons into the back country. So does that mean off-roaders are paranoid? There are a lot of illegal drug sites in the California mountains run by well known Mexican gangs. However, I'm not talking about the two-legged animals, more like the four legged type. Mountain lions, bears, etc. You never know what is out there that would make a meal out of you. Not paranoid, just prepared.
 
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