Second Generation Nissan Xterra Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
on line
Joined
·
14,014 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While installing my latest PRG suspension upgrades, I realized that I didn't have nearly the right amount or quality of tools that I should.

What do you guys use and/or recommend? I'm looking for the basics right now; wrenches, socket set, common power drill and essential accessories, and stuff like that. Also, what do you keep w/ you in the X for on-the-spot trail repairs? I fell in love w/ this set of gear wrenches that my base shop had, those things were great!
 

·
on line
Joined
·
547 Posts
honestly, a good starter set of tools is craftsman. lifetime warrenty at sears, if something breaks just take it in they give you a new one. if you got money burning a hole in your pocket go with snap-on....trail tools on the other hand you prolly dont want expensive. i got something like a 125 piece craftsman tool set when i turned 16 and its served me just fine the past 9 years. i had to replace the 1/2" drive ratchet cuz i broke it using a hammer on it (i didnt have an impact wrench or a breaker bar) and sears said "heres your new ratchet". if i wanted to i could get snap-on tools at cost, my brother-in-law is a dealer. so i have SOME but i know i'll screw 'em up so i dont take em out on the trail. just my 2 cents...
 

·
on line
Joined
·
3,272 Posts
i am sure there are better out there but i love my craftsman too. i have a crappy little 20 piece set that fits perfectly in the grove of the hatch where that pathetic "emergency kit" is supposed to say. my craftsman set is my real emergency kit.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
735 Posts
I bought a fair selection of Snap-On tools when I was in the trade, but the price they go for is even more obscene in these modern times. Some of them were found used from guys retiring, from the swap meet, and from horse-trades (and out of the back of a trunk on the street once or twice!).

I have a few Craftsman bits, but I don't whole hardily recommend them as a first choice. they are good for a mobile tool kit though, but then so are Chinese ones.

I'd look for deals on old Protos, S-K, KD tools or anything made in Japan or Germany as well. I have traded cars towards tools and cabinets and traded cash back to people who have done the same and only wanted to keep a portion of the trade.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
225 Posts
I have a Blue Point (aka. Snap On) 62 piece 1/4'' drive socket set. It has metric and standard sizes in both shallow and deep. Even has a bunch of extensions, a wratchet, and nut driver. Comes in a hard case. It's brand new. I haven't used it once. It's a very expensive set that I got a good deal on. I bought it brand new off of the Snap On tools truck yesterday for $100. We could work something out in the suspension deal if you'd like.

As for the rest of the tools... if you're not a career mechanic the tools you can get at Home Depot are good. When I first started out and needed to get my own tool set I bought Husky tools from there. I still use the majority of them everyday at work. For heavier stuff like air tools I would stick to Craftsman or Ingersol Rand. Can't go wrong.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
1,792 Posts
I'm the one that started the original thread (the "admission") a year or so ago. I took the suggestions, bought a basic Craftsman set (248 piece) and have been adding to it as needs arise ever since.

I now have a mixture of some fantastic tools (Knipex pliers from Expedition Exchange that are remarkable) which I will use constantly and will last a lifetime and some junk (like a $6 butane torch from Harbor Freight, that helped my break some thread locker on a plug) that helps me get a job done. I also have lots of in-between quality stuff. My swivel breaker bar is from Harbor Freight, but my hex sockets are Craftsman, since I use them constantly. I fixed my buddy's steering and needed a boot clamp remover/installer tool, so I picked one up at Napa while I bought the new tie rod end. Auto parts stores also loan out all sorts of stuff like pullers and spring compressors for free.

One very important point to remember: don't think "I don't have a torch." Think: I can buy a cheap torch for the price of a couple beers at the bar. Lots of tools can be had cheaply, and then you can buy quality as need and cash arise.

And another thing: It's possible to go from idiot to fairly knowledgeable by being patient, careful and persistent. READ, READ, READ. The internet, repair manuals, the 4WD mags, etc. And don't be afraid to ask. So you don't know what SAE or unsprung weight is. Big deal. Google it. Ask Greg. Ask you neighbor working on that '67 Mustang. Ask us.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
207 Posts
Logisense said:
honestly, a good starter set of tools is craftsman. lifetime warrenty at sears, if something breaks just take it in they give you a new one. if you got money burning a hole in your pocket go with snap-on....trail tools on the other hand you prolly dont want expensive. i got something like a 125 piece craftsman tool set when i turned 16 and its served me just fine the past 9 years. i had to replace the 1/2" drive ratchet cuz i broke it using a hammer on it (i didnt have an impact wrench or a breaker bar) and sears said "heres your new ratchet". if i wanted to i could get snap-on tools at cost, my brother-in-law is a dealer. so i have SOME but i know i'll screw 'em up so i dont take em out on the trail. just my 2 cents...
Over the years I have built up a pretty good colleciton of Crafstman tools and I agree they are pretty good for the money. They are certainly not the best. If I was a mechanic and used my tools day in and day out I would have spent the money on Snap-on or the like. Being able to walk into any Sears and get a replacement if something does break is a lot easier than waiting for your local Snap-on rep to get to you. Also, for about the price of a good Snap-on starter mechanics kit I have enough Craftsman tools to fill my three stackable Craftsman tool chests (together they stand over 6' tall) and that includes the price the chests.

I definetaly would get ratcheting wrenches. You will use a set of these probably more than any other tool in your aresenal.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
351 Posts
My husband has lots of Craftsman and Kobalt (Lowe's brand) tools; both have lifetime warranties on their hand tools. When we (that's right, "we", I ain't no girlie girl) installed the PRG components, we used lots of deep sockets, extensions, adapters to go from 3/8" to 1/2", various wrenches, and a Kobalt breaker bar (couldn't have done it without this) that took whatever we dished out. Having used (and broken) wrenches and sockets before, both of the above brands are definitely reasonably priced and dependable.
 

·
on line
Joined
·
735 Posts
Gear wrenches do not hold up. I also do not care for the ones that are flat and have no offset angle. If anything, a trade mech might have one or two in certain sizes for certain hard to reach jobs, but the regular wrench and air tools are usually the go-to tool.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top