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My tool kit is very close to Outback97's. 3/8 ratched and shallow + deep sockets up to 19mm. Combo wrenches in the same size. Couple extensions, cutting pliers, needle nose, phillips and flat screwdriver, ball pein hammer, multimeter, code reader, tire plug kit, silicone tape for hose leaks (it really works!), electrical tape, duct tape, a roll of bailing wire, and some electrical wire.

On spare parts here is my most important suggestion. Whatever your going to carry - go buy new parts (Nissan OEM or the brand the OEM uses like Denso or Panasonic) and change out your current ones, keeping the old as trail spares. You will have a part you know works as a spare, and you will know how to change it, rather than trying to figure that out on the trail. Ask me how I know this.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
My tool kit is very close to Outback97's. 3/8 ratched and shallow + deep sockets up to 19mm. Combo wrenches in the same size. Couple extensions, cutting pliers, needle nose, phillips and flat screwdriver, ball pein hammer, multimeter, code reader, tire plug kit, silicone tape for hose leaks (it really works!), electrical tape, duct tape, a roll of bailing wire, and some electrical wire.

On spare parts here is my most important suggestion. Whatever your going to carry - go buy new parts (Nissan OEM or the brand the OEM uses like Denso or Panasonic) and change out your current ones, keeping the old as trail spares. You will have a part you know works as a spare, and you will know how to change it, rather than trying to figure that out on the trail. Ask me how I know this.
That is a good tip!!
 

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What do you think of this tool kit as a base for making a trail tool kit that stays in the car:
......
I was about to post something similar. I bought a fairly inexpensive 200+ piece kit from Harbor Freight and it all fits into a bag like you posted that is about 10" x 10" x 15". It's a little bulky but small enough to fit in with all of my stuff. It's definitely overkill, but that's a good thing. I've had to use that kit for a fair number of trail repairs and it's always had what I needed. If room allows I'll throw in the 1/2" impact driver.

One thing a lot of people tend to overlook is basic survival tools. In the tool bag I just mentioned I also threw in a large pill bottle full of matches, a zip lock bag with cotton balls soaked in vasoline, traditional fire starter sticks and a life straw. When I go on somewhat longer trips, a case of water and box of Cliff bars are always thrown in. I've been stranded by some incredibly random events that is almost impossible to foresee. One time (in a buddy's side by side) the tie rod nut vibrated loose and was lost, the tie rod came out and we were stuck 10 miles from our camp, which was another 40 miles from town. Some how (and to this day we don't know how) the cotter pin came out (likely was never reinstalled) and we were dead on the trail. We searched for over an hour for that tie rod nut with no luck. We had tools, but nothing that would help us get back on the trail. Finally it dawned on me that I could sacrifice my key ring to act as a cotter pin and that got us back to camp. I carry a few spare cotter pins to this day, lol.

Another time, we were hunting and got stuck down in a valley in crusty, drifted snow around mid day that constantly had that side by side high centered on hard snow. It took us another 12 hours to travel about 3 miles because we had to winch our way out damn near every foot (props to Smittybuilt winches). It was about 25 degrees, we had already quartered and packed 3 elk and were physically exhausted before all of that even started. Luckily we had enough water, but we had no food, no emergency call service, no way of starting a fire and were starting to get pretty worried. What was supposed to be a quick in and out trip turned into a 20+ hour long sh!t show that could have been much worse had that winch died on us, or the fuel ran out in the side by side.
 

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GED.

You should be able to handle most any repair with the kit you posted.
I would add a needle nose plier with a curved jaw as it makes removing hose clamps easier.
 

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What do you think of this tool kit as a base for making a trail tool kit that stays in the car:
...

What I like in this one:
  • short and deep sockets
  • comes in a bag (not a molded case where you can't replace or complete the original tools)
  • real screwdrivers (not just the bits)
  • reasonably priced at $120.

Do you know of any better starter tool kit?
I don't know about the quality of those, and don't have a better alternative in mind other than piecing something together, but it does look like you get a decent amount of tools.

Just off the top of my head I'd want to add:
another 3/8" drive ratchet and / or small breaker bar for redundancy
metric combo wrenches
21mm six point deep socket for lug nuts
channel lock pliers
vice grips

Note that my add on list could add quite a bit to the cost of that kit if you chose decent quality tools.
 

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I don't know about the quality of those, and don't have a better alternative in mind other than piecing something together, but it does look like you get a decent amount of tools.
To that point, but directed at my post, I will add that Harbor Freight tools, specifically ratchet wrenches, regular wrenches and socket sets seem to be fairly robust. The only issues I've had with them were the rubber handles failing apart and I had a 14mm ratcheting wrench's internals come apart, but to be fair I did have a 18" cheater bar and a fair amount of torque on it before it let go, but that's not what they're made to handle either.. I took the entire set back and they gave me an entire new set, without even asking for a receipt. I also have a set of impact metric sockets that I've literally beaten with hammers that have held up extremely well.
 

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To that point, but directed at my post, I will add that Harbor Freight tools, specifically ratchet wrenches, regular wrenches and socket sets seem to be fairly robust. The only issues I've had with them were the rubber handles failing apart and I had a 14mm ratcheting wrench's internals come apart, but to be fair I did have a 18" cheater bar and a fair amount of torque on it before it let go, but that's not what they're made to handle either.. I took the entire set back and they gave me an entire new set, without even asking for a receipt. I also have a set of impact metric sockets that I've literally beaten with hammers that have held up extremely well.
I agree and have had good luck with HF hand tools. My post earlier in the thread (post #14) of my minimal tool kit contains several HF sourced items.

My rule of thumb is that I don't rely on anything from there that could seriously injure or kill me if it fails.
 

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My favorite Harbor Freight tool is the Serpentine belt tool.
Basically a long thin bar with a fitting at the end for a socket.

When I purchased this tool originally, it came as a bar only.
Currently this tool comes as a kit with sockets and crows foot wrenches.

Every day cost is apx $19.00
Catch it on sale or use a 20% off coupon for a little less.

I've considered purchasing one for my X
With some modification, I could get it into my tool kit if I shortened it a bit.
 

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I should probably pack a better tool kit, but usually I find that some sort of tool kit is better than no tool kit out in the 'bush'.

My .02, for $7.00, I've never been wrong with these bad boys. I think I have two complete sets around the house if I put them together.

 

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I've received my order and I'm very happy with it:

132571


And it all fits into the bag:
132572


I've completed the basic tool kit with:

A few of my thoughts / first impressions:
Lots of screwdrivers, but in fact they can be classified quickly:
  • a bunch of precision screwdrivers.
  • A couple of Philips & a couple of Flat
  • Stubby Flat & Philips (very useful to remove your mud flaps when half torn off by the trail. Don't ask me how I know that...)
  • A hex / six-pan Screwdriver for all the bits in the small two boxes of bits.
  • A Square 1/4" screwdriver that you can use for the 1/4" sockets.
so very easy to find what you need.

The ratchet handles are basic but felt good quality: heavy and lots of teeth (72?).
The screwdrivers are magnetic.
The whole kit felt like a good quality items, much more than an entry-level basic.

The black bag has room for me to add more tools as I do my maintenance with this kit and learn what it's missing.
I also like that it's all black as it hides well in the trunk (instead of a bright orange bag a la Ridgid).
 
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