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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, I want to state, that I am in NO WAY trying to cut in on Jim's business or in any way stray from what has been proven on this site.
I had originally researched and chosen a set of sliders (Trailgear) for the FJ and then bought the new love of my life, the X. I've been checking their site ever since to see if they came out with an option for my new ride. No such luck. I want to save some coin, try something a little different, and have the satisfaction of completing a project. So I started probing their site and found these.
http://www.trail-gear.com/rocksliders.html
The 58" seem as though they would be the correct length. Since the legs are pre-notched on one end and flat on the other I can cut them to length. I do not plan on welding to the frame them as I would prefer resale value (not planning on selling it, just want to be smart with my investments, I modded my last truck and got bent over on trade-in because of it) and the ability to remove them to paint them and for touch-ups.

Now I have to compare them to Shrock's. For comparison only to determine if they are strong enough. No flaming please.
-Trailgear 1.75"x0.120" round HREW with 3 legs and 3 supports on the hoop
-Shrock 1.75"x0.134"DOM with 2 legs and 2 supports on the hoop
I know that the Shrock square/round material will be stronger than the Trailgear, just hoping that the extra legs and supports will make up for it.

As far as I can tell the boxed frame on the X has nothing running thru it. The gas and brake lines are on the top, so drilling it will not damage anything. If you scroll down on that link, you will see their gusset kit. I can fab that a heck of a lot cheaper. In their install instructions, they recommend welding it to the frame. Not gonna happen. I plan on using grade 8 hardware and washers on the inside of the frame. I can place the leg and the holes in the plates that I will make to avoid or to utilize holes in the frame.

I can have them powdercoated locally, but prefer not to. On my last build, I purchased a nice pre runner front bumper that was powdercoated. For the rear bumper I fitted a swingaway tube tire-carrier/jack/jerrican holder that I bought in raw metal form, sectioned it and made mounting hardware similar to what I'm proposing to do now. I applied Durabak in a rather half-hearted rushed manner. The Durabak and the powdercoat finally rusted at about the same time. My point? I could get Durabak by the quart for touch ups. Powdercoat was a total loss. These sliders WILL get hacked. I'm leaning towards a good primer and prep, and Rustoleum with a touch up done every fall. Minnesota road salt suckkkkk.

I've searched here and know that fabbing these theings from scratch won't put you ahead. I don't buy junk, and would never slap something together that could leave me stranded, get my rockers pounded, or fold when the weight of the X is on my hi-lift. I am a fairly decent welder and my buddy who will help me, does it for a living. Bottom line, it will be done right.

Suggestions? Comments? Criticism? Let'em fly. I respect your opinions.
 

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I'd say if you have the means and the know how, go for it. I believe the majority of us who go with Shrock do so because of the quality and durability of Jim's products and know that he stands by his work. Also, his products are made specifically for our vehicles, and bolt into existing holes where possible. If you do go the route, make sure to do a "how to".
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
D-Day said:
I'd say if you have the means and the know how, go for it. I believe the majority of us who go with Shrock do so because of the quality and durability of Jim's products and know that he stands by his work. Also, his products are made specifically for our vehicles, and bolt into existing holes where possible. If you do go the route, make sure to do a "how to".
And thats the exact reason I want it to be clear that I am not offering up a replacement, just an alternative. I have to watch where my money goes on this build, some things I can buy, some things I can make.
If it comes about a How-to will follow.
 

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Kudos on trying other products man. We all know Shrockworks is great. It won't hurt their business. Heck, I wish my Shrock sliders had 3 leg supports.
 

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lifeinthesouth said:
Steve, have you decided yet?
Not really. I am putting it off because I just sent the $$ on some skids.
I am planning on going to Paragon with a couple of my buddies in Feb. though, so I've gotta make up my mind soon.
I am thinking Demello, I know the 4xI ones would give me some extra protection, but the Demello sliders are just soo damn sexy.
 

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norshor,

I applaud your ambition, and say go for it 100%. I'm a little unsure about the .120 tube, though; search around some rockcrawling forums and see what the guys on there are using (or a forum that represents the type of 'wheeling you'll be doing). At first glance, I would think that 1/8" tube is a little light for absorbing strong impacts, but the additional supports could help this significantly. I am actually in the process of building a set of sliders myself, utilizing square and round tube both, similar to the Shrocks. I'm using 2x2x.187 for the main under the truck, and 1.5diax.120 HREW for the outside 'hoop' (DOM is a lot stronger material, but about 3-4 times as expensive). In this scenario I think the .120 wall is fine... it is not the main protection of the vehicle. But, others with first hand experience feel free to chime in on the thickness.

As for the bolting thru the frame, do something on the inside as to not crush the frame. Make at least a pair of rectangular brackets (6" high minimum, you decide on the length for your application) for each mounting point, one on the inside, one on the outside. Then, run your bolts thru these. If you just have the plate on the outside and washer on the inside, once you start wrenching down the bolts, it will start to crush the frame; if you use a plate that extends to the top and bottom bends of the frame, the stress will be distributed to the stronger points of the frame. Another, more involved option... sleeve the bolt holes; plenty of guys do this for shackle reverse kits on Jeeps and the like.

But, most importantly... take lots of pics and post results when you are done! Happy fabbing! ~Steve
 

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fabbing them up is super easy! i did mine, and all it costed me was about 80 bucks worth of steel.... i hi-lift it up one side and no peoblems.





I just welded mine to the frame...no bigie tome that its welded on.
 

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Yeah I work in a weld/fab shop and I just went around and picked out all the supplies I need to make mine. I am not ripping on shrock at all, I just think it would be fun to make my own...
 

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rusticle4 said:
Yeah I work in a weld/fab shop and I just went around and picked out all the supplies I need to make mine. I am not ripping on shrock at all, I just think it would be fun to make my own...
H$ll yeah, if I had the means and the skill... why not. Definitely not rocket science.
Can't wait to see'em.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My TrailGear sliders showed up a week after I ordered them, which happened to be in the middle of a blizzard. They look good and I hope to start the install soon. Unfortunately, I'm still digging out of the snow, and have to tear the front diff on my wheeler apart to adjust thin ring and pinion and to see what I broke plowing this last week. Will post pics of the sliders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
RockyMtnX said:
Good start... can't wait to see how they look on the X. What did you end up paying to get the tube to you? (ie, total price shipped)
$191 total
$135 for the sliders, $19 for the gussets, $37 shipping had them in six days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
DBAX said:
:thumbleft:
your bolt-in solution is simple, clean, and I'm sure effective.
MINE'RE WELDED ON
I too will weld them on more than likely. Have one idea left- welding studs on those brackets and welding the bracket to the frame. and then making another 3/16 plate to weld/gusset to the leg of the slider, and then bolt to the studs.
DBAX, when you welded those to the frame, did you move the gas lines, as in loosen them up??
The only thing I have against welding them to the frame, is that when damage or rust occurs, which it will, I can't just take them off and repair them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well we started. Enjoy!!


Lined the sliders up against the X, to get an idea how we want them to fit. Used 3 jackstands. The only problem with jackstands, is that the don't allow for infinite adjustment, every click up or down, could be more or less than you wanted. I opened the door frequently, to find out how close we were to the body lines. I put a level in the doorjamb, and matched the angle to the slider. My X isn't perfectly level, and neither is my garage floor. Fun and games.


This is the front mount being held up against the frame with a small bottle jack. (The orange in the pic, is from my heater)
I put the first of the three mounts about an inch behind the body mount, so that I could weld a bead on that side. The bottle jack is there because the factory jack point is underneath the "L", which I will cut off once the braces are all welded up, and there is no clearance behind it for a c-clamp. I don't want to have to have HiLift with me to change a tire and would like to be able to use the factory jack. I had to watch this mount, because between crawling in and out while measuring and tacking these things up, it worked it way loose.


Center mount, with a tack. We tacked the center first, so we could pull the front or back, in or out and be able to pivot.


Another shot of the center support. This is the support that really counts in fitting up. Through trial and error, we found it best to pull the slider off to cut the other 2 legs by putting the other 2 next to the center mount to match length. We clamped them in the tripod and matched the outside legs angles to the center with a level.


This is the back mount, c-clamped waiting for it's brace.


At this point, we used just the center jackstand. Clamped that center plate to the frame, and used the level to line up the other 2 braces to their plates. Had to check the door sill many times to make sure it was at the same line as the slider. Lots of opening and closing of doors to be sure the braces were the right length, and that it fit right. Hint, if you do this, and you are the guy underneath the truck tacking the braces, before your buddies say its perfect and slam the rear door, make sure your knee is out of the way. Or you'll be pissed off that your limping the next day. Won't let that happen again :compress:


Finish-welding the braces and adding gussets. Burnt through all my wire, and need to get more.
I will try to get the other side tacked up Thursday. And then prepped and covered with TuffCoat.
 

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Looks good, norshor. That sure is a pain getting everything lined up just right so the front and back are equal distance from the body, and everything sits level with the body. When I did mine, I cut the front and rear 'frame to tube' supports at the same length, welded them to the outer tube, then began the wrestling match to try to get the slider both level and lined up with the frame brackets. By the time I got to side two, I finally figured out the best way to do it was to remove the saddle from the jack and clamp the slider to the jack, then shim it to get it perfectly level; second side took 1/4 of the time the first side did, if not less. Plus I was doing it by myself, so that certainly added to the frustration. As it ended up, I think everything came out pretty level, but the front sticks out 1/4" further than the back; oh well, close enough (I still need to finish them and get them bolted up to see exactly how everything came out). So, I feel your pain!

Question- How far does your 'hoop' tube stick out from the main tube? Looks like about 7-8" to me, maybe? I ask because that is the final step I have left on mine... cutting and welding the outer tube to the main... and yours look about right to me.

Good job, man... can't wait to see the finished product!
 
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