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Same Country as Bucksnort
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Nice catch.....

This product was added to our catalog on Friday 01 August, 2014



"Picture for reference only not exact product"

$1995.00 spendy.... but you get what you pay for.
still need Steevo to post up the specs....
 

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Not a new topic, but it is the first time I've actually seen them for sale.
http://www.thenewx.org/forum/showthread.php?t=64544&highlight=RCV&page=5
That thread ended with "coming soon..."

They are fantastic, but come at one hell of a price. I'm stock width and getting some CV bind because I'm running ~4" lift. It's still way more cost effective to buy a new CV from O'Riley's with a warrentey and replace them when they fail. I am completly maxed out droop at stock width, and I couldn't gain much from upgraded CVs. IF there was significant gains to be made at Titan width than there could be solid argument made for their value. Otherwise they are just a $2000 piece of mind, another way to throw money at your X.

That being said, it is likely that there is more to be gained at Titan width that stock. The hard limit I've found at stock is the coil bucket. Longer arms would clear it further and could allow more exteem angles. Also, with Dirt King's upper and lower arms it is easy to imagine a setup where the CVs are the limiting factor. This is not with the standard PRG SAW coilovers though. Many people people have run those without CV issues. You'd have to be running a custom coilover setup- or just the SAWs with spacers, I guess- to require these to make your setup work.
 

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Good point on the angular capacity of the RCVs vs. stock half-axle assemblies ... that's an aspect I hadn't actually considered yet; and certainly bears some thought. It may be that the argument for RCVs lies there ... however, I think (for the purposes of the Xterra) claiming that these are necessary purely for their strength, is a bit of red herring ... yes, they will be (much) stronger than stock. But is that really necessary? I'd argue not.

For a truck with a SFA, where you'd have to tear down the front hub and pull out either side shaft, were one of the steering joints (or either shaft) to fail ... or put another way, where the whole side shaft is effectively inside the axle ... then I agree, you want to put as much strength internal to the assembly as you can (and as your wallet can tolerate); with the goal being to put the weakest link someplace external to the axle - like the front DS u-joints.

On the Nissan IFS, a halfshaft swap is relatively easily done ... and at ~$100 (or less) for a trail spare, there's a fair amount of wheeling that can be done before I'd consider socking away $2k for RCV assemblies. I think that dichotomy is further compounded when the diff internals are beefed up ... if you've done that (with an ARB or a lunchbox locker); then with these RCVs, I'd think you're looking at the next weak link either being one of the front hub assemblies, or perhaps the diff-internal side-shaft.

Am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good point on the angular capacity of the RCVs vs. stock half-axle assemblies ... that's an aspect I hadn't actually considered yet; and certainly bears some thought. It may be that the argument for RCVs lies there ... however, I think (for the purposes of the Xterra) claiming that these are necessary purely for their strength, is a bit of red herring ... yes, they will be (much) stronger than stock. But is that really necessary? I'd argue not.

For a truck with a SFA, where you'd have to tear down the front hub and pull out either side shaft, were one of the steering joints (or either shaft) to fail ... or put another way, where the whole side shaft is effectively inside the axle ... then I agree, you want to put as much strength internal to the assembly as you can (and as your wallet can tolerate); with the goal being to put the weakest link someplace external to the axle - like the front DS u-joints.

On the Nissan IFS, a halfshaft swap is relatively easily done ... and at ~$100 (or less) for a trail spare, there's a fair amount of wheeling that can be done before I'd consider socking away $2k for RCV assemblies. I think that dichotomy is further compounded when the diff internals are beefed up ... if you've done that (with an ARB or a lunchbox locker); then with these RCVs, I'd think you're looking at the next weak link either being one of the front hub assemblies, or perhaps the diff-internal side-shaft.

Am I missing something?
Basically my thoughts as well. But I'd still like to have them :tard:

Best of everything would be ARB carrier, Chromoly internal side shafts and RCV half shafts. Then the drive-shaft U-joint or hub would be the weak link. Bullet proof IFS setups get pricey fast.
 

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Same Country as Bucksnort
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I have brand new OEM Titan axles.
Also have Used Titan axles for trail spares.
Also have a set of CARDONE ones(for sale).

If I go through the new ones, the spares, then maybe

....................but still interested. :)
 

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My next venture is to try an lower the m205 and with that I wouldn't have much use for these but I highly doubt a titan swapped X is going to break these. Lowering the diff a little will allow for further down travel and not cause Cv binds. Cyclemut used to do this to a lot of older Nissans and we've fired the idea back and forth just haven't had time to do any solid R&D. However with that said, Ive been running oem titan cvs and they are a much more soild Cv than the Rockauto ones and bind at about 1/2" lower than the Rockauto ones. Ive torn both apart to replace boots and I can honestly say you get what you pay for.
 

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Let me preface this by acknowledging that Rugged Rocks has some amazing products and that Steeev-o is great to deal with. Not my intention to slam him or his company.

Now, with that out of the way, I just cannot see the upside to spending $2K on super strong CVs.

Any given drivetrain is going to have a weak link. Lock the front diff on our trucks and -voila- weak link moves from spider gears to CV. Personally, I LOVE having the CV be the weak point, because it's a very easy fix - even on the trail (especially with titan swap).

If I'm going to break my drivetrain somewhere, I like the idea of it being in a spot that's a) inexpensive to fix, b) easy to fix and c) easy to carry all the necessary parts & tools for. A+B+C=CV.

Why fork out two grand just to move the weak link in the drivetrain back to the diff, or to the driveshaft, or to the U-joint? :confused::dontknow:

The only possible reason to put these things on my X would be for a tremendously greater angle without binding. And it would have to be an amazing increase in angle to justify all that cash!
 

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Super Moderator / Middle Atlantic Regional Moderat
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I have been through 4 Cardone Titan CVs so far and I haven't even spent $200 yet. I think I will stick with the cheaper alternative.

Props to Rugged Rocks for offering more products. Steve always does a nice job and my truck is running lots of his products.
 

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Hi Guys, I appreciate the positive reviews on the company.

I would like to throw in a few words on the shafts.

Obviously they are not cheap, and I do realize that these are not for everyone.
However, I do have some things for you all to consider. CV's don't typically explode cruis'n the streets on the way to the movies with a smok'n hot date, or even without the smok'n hot date. But if they did, they'd always be easy to replace on nice flat ground close to home where you can run around the corner and grab another and still make it to the movie on time. But they typically fail at the worst possible time, in the middle of nowhere, trying to get up some obstacle. sometimes wheelspin is involved getting up something steep, crawling a rock face, or trying to pop out of an undercut... then Pow! another shaft is only $80 right? how much is your time and frustration worth when this is the 5th, 7th or 10th time this has happened? or how about the potential danger of being instantly crippled and put into 2WD (or 3WD w/ lockers) half way up an obstacle or through a rock garden that you had a minimal chance of making it through in the first place with 4 wheel drive. This is where things get real and you're wrenching in unfavorable conditions..... again.


and regarding the comments on moving the weak link to somewhere else, yes you move the weak link, but that new weak link is stronger than the previous weak link. so in the end the entire assembly is stronger, and you'll have to push it harder to find where that new weak link is.

These are made of 300M & 4340 chromoly by a company that has a long history of making helicopter parts. these shafts are made here in the U.S, have a lifetime warranty and have also been available for the R180 since the beginning of the year. I have a few guys running them and they have been great.

It all comes back down to where you want to wheel, how hard you want to wheel and how often you're willing to wrench on your rig. Again these aren't for everyone but for the guy that want to be on the next level... there is RCV.
 

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Sound logic ... and hard to argue with, but that price tag tho ... :geek: ... hey, it's just money, right? :eek:ccasion5:
 
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