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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

Over the previous weekends I've been making some refreshing improvements to my new-to-me 209k mile 2010 Xterra. I started with a radiator replacement with a Koyo A2807, which I found to be a fantastic budget replacement options. If you didn't know, this radiator actually has an increased core size as compared to OEM and to all other aftermarket radiators that aren't a full-aluminum racing radiator. OEM is 1.25" single-row core thickness, and Koyo A2807 is 1.4" dual row. This allows a bit more strength and surface area to the cooling tubes and fins as well as a bit more cooling capacity. Here's a shot of the inside of the Koyo for visual aid:
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Anyways, after doing this install I found that my transmission cooler lines that plumb into the radiator were so worn out that they were slipping off at idle even with hose clamps doubled up. I decided that instead of trying to slap more band-aids on it, I would just replace all the transmission cooler lines. I tend to use OEM parts but found that the prices for these hoses were pretty out there and tracked down the equivalent replacement. I found on this board that the proper size is 5/16" ID hose, and then after spending time on the BITOG forums I went down the rabbit hole of inline transmission filters. I thought this to be a good idea because our trucks do not have a serviceable/replaceable transmission filter like some vehicles do. I saw Magnefine filters recommended here and there, but I found a WIX equivalent that the local parts store carried as I was trying to do the job the same day. Here's the parts I picked up from the local O'Reilly:

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The WIX filter is plastic body, but is a magnetic and substrate filter with a nominal 25 micron and 200 psi rating. Magnefine doesn't publish their nominal ratings from what I could find but it's been reported that they are rated to 35 microns nominal. So WIX seemed like a win for me.

Since the radiator was brand new and didn't have any mileage on it, I decided to place the filter in the supply line to the radiator for a couple reasons. First was that I was replacing the line any way, and that it was the easiest spot to get to and mount. There is a hose loop in the radiator shroud near the engine oil filter that I found the be a perfect spot. Second reason was to provide filtration to the fluid before it reached the radiator's fresh internal cooler. I've seen it debated on BITOG that these should go in the return line of the transmission, especially if the vehicle is not new, but for me ease of access and replacement won out. Here's some pics:

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There's two hard lines coming from the transmission. The upper most hard line is what is connected to the driver's side inlet of the radiator. This is the supply line. The filter is a directional filter so make sure that the flow direction arrow points from the upper transmission hard line to the radiator inlet. The fitting on the passenger side of the radiator is the outlet, and that flows upwards to the top fitting of the external fluid-to-air transmission cooler. The hose in that location is a two-piece hose with a male-male barb fitting in the middle. I pulled the entire line out and replaced it with one continuous section of the Gates 27058 5/16" trans cooler hose. The OEM hose has an outer sleeve with an "S" curve to it, I removed it from the stock and slipped it over the new hose to provide it some rubbing and wear protection where the hose routes down next to the radiator shroud. You can see some of it here:

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The line coming off the bottom of that cooler is the return line, and this line goes down back to the lower hard line of the transmission. This would also be an ideal place to mount the filter, with the arrow pointing towards the transmission. But it's a little bit of a tight spot and it would be a PITA to replace the filter when the interval came, and also, I ran out of hose lol. If you are looking to replace all the lines, I recommend buying 8 feet of hose and a couple more clamps, I bought 6 feet and 6 clamps and came up a bit short. I'll be replacing that line with the same hose either next service interval or whenever it decides to give me trouble.

Hope this information is useful to some of you!
 

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No disrespect, but this seems a fix to a problem which dont exist.

Routinely change your fluids and keep your lines in good order.
Don't overheat or abuse your transmission and it can last the life of your vehicle.
 
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Ps: Two thumbs up on the Wix XP oil filter :)
 

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My 99 1 ton Ford had a TSB on adding a inline magnetic filter even though it has a pretty large felt type filter in the pan. I think a new one cost about $18 as I just completed the task of servicing the tranny yesterday. 17 quarts and a Wix filter. At least the pan gasket is reusable.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No disrespect, but this seems a fix to a problem which dont exist.

Routinely change your fluids and keep your lines in good order.
Don't overheat or abuse your transmission and it can last the life of your vehicle.
Oh no doubt, this could certainly be considered overkill. But, seeing as how my trans has over 200k on it, I wanted to do what I can to prolong it as much as possible. Previous owner did Amsoil trans flushes every 30k and I did just that along with the improvements listed here. WIX makes some damn good filters so I figured why not more protection? It's less than 30 bucks and easy to change!
 

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A trans filter is a good idea, not overkill at all.

However, since your transmission and ATF cooler are not new, change the initial filter very soon. You do not want any residual debris from years of operation to clog the filter and impede flow of ATF back to the transmission. By the third filter you can confidently establish a regular maintenance schedule for periodic replacement.

The 300*, 400 psi Gates hose you used should be fine as long as it is listed as compatible with ATF.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A trans filter is a good idea, not overkill at all.

However, since your transmission and ATF cooler are not new, change the initial filter very soon. You do not want any residual debris from years of operation to clog the filter and impede flow of ATF back to the transmission. By the third filter you can confidently establish a regular maintenance schedule for periodic replacement.

The 300*, 400 psi Gates hose you used should be fine as long as it is listed as compatible with ATF.
Great tip, thanks! I did not mention that but I do plan to change it at the same time I change the engine oil filter the next couple changes in order to do just that. Then I will be reasonably confident I can extend the filter intervals. Putting the filter next to the engine oil filter makes it especially easy to do simultaneously.

The hose I am using is intended for transmission cooler lines as specified by Gates.
 

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If it's a plastic body, carefully cut open after use and take a look. It's regularly done with small aircraft engine filters
 

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I certainly don't think its a bad idea, but it would be interesting to know the pressure / flow drop across the filter. Lowering flow will lower cooling capacity, and it seems to me your more likely to hurt your trans from heat than debris if your changing our fluids frequently? It does look like a fairly large filter so maybe very little - however you mentioned its a one way filter, so often those types do offer some restriction?
 

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When I changed the one in the truck the flow of the old fluid without it running was pretty robust. When I blew through the new filter I could not discern any restriction. Found this AM a filter on the powersteering return as well.
 

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I certainly don't think its a bad idea, but it would be interesting to know the pressure / flow drop across the filter. Lowering flow will lower cooling capacity, and it seems to me your more likely to hurt your trans from heat than debris if your changing our fluids frequently? It does look like a fairly large filter so maybe very little - however you mentioned its a one way filter, so often those types do offer some restriction?
On a practical level I doubt any pressure loss or flow restriction from the filter will have any adverse effect on the transmission as long as the filter media is not clogged. That's why I suggested shorter service intervals for the first two filters.
 

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When I hit 200k miles on my transmission I will think about adding a filter also. :)
 
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