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Discussion Starter #1
My 2007 Xterra has the Fuel Level Sensor issue which causes the SES to come on. The extended warranty is now over and I don't want to pay $500 (actual quote) to replace what's basically a nuisance. The problem is my sticker expires at the end of this month and the SES is still on. I can get it to go off by disconnecting the battery, but I've been told the ECU records every code for the last 120 miles. Is that true? Has anybody had luck clearing the SES and immediately passing inspection? Are there any other options? PLEASE HELP!
 

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Not sure about the 120 miles, but on my Charger it is 5 or 6 startup, drive to full warm, and shutoff cycles before it is ready for inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not sure about the 120 miles, but on my Charger it is 5 or 6 startup, drive to full warm, and shutoff cycles before it is ready for inspection.
Thanks for the input but different car, different manufacturer. I know this is a common problem with the X. Has nobody run into this?
 

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Mine runs out this month. We'll see. My sticker is almost $30 anyway because I have a lifted truck. What a money making racket.
 

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Codes cleared, are not remembered. That 120 miles thing you heard is BS. In order to pass, you must have all or most (depending on state) of your readiness monitors reset. These monitors turn from not ready to ready after several drive cycles. In your particular case, your best bet to cheat is go go fill the tank, then clear the code, then drive for a week or two but do not let your tank get below about a half tank. That should be enough to get the monitors ready, including the evap monitor which needs to run when the tank is about half full or less, but not set the FSU code that usually sets at about a 1/4 tank or after filling.
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Thanks for the input but different car, different manufacturer. I know this is a common problem with the X. Has nobody run into this?
Different car, but he's correct.

Cars built at least within the last decade utilize a computer flag. You can't just reset a code or disconnect the battery and drive immediately to emissions.

The computer will not be in 'ready' state until a couple start ups / warm ups.

They will tell you to come back when the computer is in ready state and cycled through, in which case your code will be back.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok so general agreement is that the flag will need to be cleared. But I'm hearing "a few cycles" from klundquist and Labbie but Surf and Snow is suggesting a couple of weeks. Anyone have any more information on this?
 

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Ok so general agreement is that the flag will need to be cleared. But I'm hearing "a few cycles" from klundquist and Labbie but Surf and Snow is suggesting a couple of weeks. Anyone have any more information on this?
It's not a hard fast number of cycles. The FSM for each vehicle, including the X says what all is required, like accelerating to 55mph steadily with about a 50% average throttle, than decelerating to 30 without using the brakes, followed by idling for 30 seconds for example, followed by.. Yada yada. Something like that. It could be a couple days or a couple weeks depending on how you drive etc.
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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, but just because the SES goes off, even if it is on its own, it doesn't mean I'm ready to go to get my sticker, right?
 

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From the FSM:

SRT Set Timing
SRT is set as “CMPLT” after self-diagnosis has been performed one or more times. Completion of SRT is
done regardless of whether the result is OK or NG. The set timing is different between OK and NG results and
is shown in the table below.
OK: Self-diagnosis is carried out and the result is OK.
NG: Self-diagnosis is carried out and the result is NG.
—: Self-diagnosis is not carried out.
When all SRT related self-diagnoses showed OK results in a single cycle (Ignition OFF-ON-OFF), the SRT will
indicate “CMPLT”. → Case 1 above
When all SRT related self-diagnoses showed OK results through several different cycles, the SRT will indicate
“CMPLT” at the time the respective self-diagnoses have at least one OK result. → Case 2 above
If one or more SRT related self-diagnoses showed NG results in 2 consecutive cycles, the SRT will also indicate
“CMPLT”. → Case 3 above
The table above shows that the minimum number of cycles for setting SRT as “INCMP” is one (1) for each
self-diagnosis (Case 1 & 2) or two (2) for one of self-diagnoses (Case 3). However, in preparation for the state
emissions inspection, it is unnecessary for each self-diagnosis to be executed twice (Case 3) for the following
reasons:
The SRT will indicate “CMPLT” at the time the respective self-diagnoses have one (1) OK result.
The emissions inspection requires “CMPLT” of the SRT only with OK self-diagnosis results.
When, during SRT driving pattern, 1st trip DTC (NG) is detected prior to “CMPLT” of SRT, the self-diagnosis
memory must be erased from ECM after repair.
If the 1st trip DTC is erased, all the SRT will indicate “INCMP”.
NOTE:
SRT can be set as “CMPLT” together with the DTC(s). Therefore, DTC check must always be carried out
prior to the state emission inspection even though the SRT indicates “CMPLT”.
SRT Service Procedure
If a vehicle has failed the state emissions inspection due to one or more SRT items indicating “INCMP”, review
the flowchart diagnostic sequence on the next page.

Drive cycles:

The time required for each diagnosis varies with road surface conditions, weather, altitude, individual driving
habits, etc.
Zone A refers to the range where the time, required for the diagnosis under normal conditions*, is the
shortest.
Zone B refers to the range where the diagnosis can still be performed if the diagnosis is not completed
within zone A.
*: Normal conditions refer to the following:
Sea level
Flat road
Ambient air temperature: 20 - 30°C (68 - 86°F)
Diagnosis is performed as quickly as possible under normal conditions.
Under different conditions [For example: ambient air temperature other than 20 - 30°C (68 - 86°F)], diagnosis
may also be performed.
Pattern 1:
The engine is started at the engine coolant temperature of −10 to 35°C (14 to 95°F)
(where the voltage between the ECM terminal 73 and ground is 3.0 - 4.3V).
The engine must be operated at idle speed until the engine coolant temperature is greater than
70°C (158°F) (where the voltage between the ECM terminal 73 and ground is lower than 1.4V).
The engine is started at the fuel tank temperature of warmer than 0°C (32°F) (where the voltage
between the ECM terminal 107 and ground is less than 4.1V).
Pattern 2:
When steady-state driving is performed again even after it is interrupted, each diagnosis can be conducted.
In this case, the time required for diagnosis may be extended.
Pattern 3:
Operate vehicle following the driving pattern shown in the figure.
Replace the accelerator pedal during decelerating vehicle speed
from 90km/h (56MPH) to 0km/h (0MPH).
Pattern 4:
The accelerator pedal must be held very steady during steadystate
driving.
If the accelerator pedal is moved, the test must be conducted all
over again.
*1: Depress the accelerator pedal until vehicle speed is 90 km/h (56
MPH), then release the accelerator pedal and keep it released for
more than 10 seconds. Depress the accelerator pedal until vehicle
speed is 90 km/h (56 MPH) again.
*2: Checking the vehicle speed with GST is advised.
Suggested Transmission Gear Position for A/T Models
Set the selector lever in the D position with the overdrive switch turned ON.
Suggested Upshift Speeds for M/T Models
Shown below are suggested vehicle speeds for shifting into a higher gear. These suggestions relate to fuel
economy and vehicle performance. Actual upshift speeds will vary according to road conditions, the weather
and individual driving habits.


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On other vehicle brands I have wired a resistor between the high and low side of the sending unit wiring to trick the ecm into thinking the vehicle had about a half tank. Not sure if it will work on the X though.
 

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On other vehicle brands I have wired a resistor between the high and low side of the sending unit wiring to trick the ecm into thinking the vehicle had about a half tank. Not sure if it will work on the X though.
It will work, but it means cutting into the body harness. I've heard of people doing it inside the tank, but I'm very leery about modifying any wiring inside a fuel tank for obvious reasons. As for changing the fsu, mine was $120 for parts and I had an independent garage do the work, 2 hours of labor. Cost $270 and it was done. All I had to do then to get the code to clear was drive the truck for a bit and put gas in it. Went back the same day and got my sticker.
 
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