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Anyone have any issues with 3-4 inch suspension lift (with UCA's ofcourse) and having your geometry for your CV shafts be too steep? If you do, what did you do or what can be done to remedy this???
 

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Some guys are running 3in CO spacers without issue but I'd probably recommend a long travel UCA. If you have the coin, TS or diff drop bracket is were you gotta go but the pros and cons of each are up for debate and Im sure you can find many threads on the topic.

A good mix, IMO, is 2in BL and 2in SL with 33 tires.

But it all depends on what you want, how you wheel, and the amount of cheddar you got to do it.

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I've been on the site for quite a while now, and read pretty much all of the suspension tech & issues threads that come up ... I think I can honestly say that I've not heard of anyone having a long term issue with the half-shafts, that's due to driveline angles.

There have been a couple of folks who ran pretty steep angles (Oz, LaRana and Flyfish come to mind; off hand) and certainly didn't keep only to the pavement or mild trails, either ... and while expressing some concern themselves - and responding to observations from others, over steep CV angles, I don't think they ever got to the point where they talked about needing to revamp the front due to that factor alone. I don't think I've even seen anyone post about excessive wear due to angle.

I think we just happen to be fortunate in our IFS configuration, or in the CV design, that there are other things (spindle ball joints, front shocks) that are more limiting of front suspension droop than the half-shafts.

Others may have a different opinion, or more detailed observations, but that's my initial thought ... and to be clear, I'm not saying don't worry about it; but if you're not maxing out the shocks as much as possible (by running some kind of custom short body, long travel unit, or non-stock mounts to increase available travel) and you're running one of the 'standard' aftermarket UCAs that have a built in droop stop (PRG, Total Chaos) then you're likely going to be good to go.

I think part of any new suspension install should be a cycling of the full travel, to check for areas of bind and to confirm bump and droop stop impact areas ... and a check of CV angle can be a part of that, if you're happy with how things look, run it!
 
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