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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Getting a little concerned since a few days now with sound and feeling when pushing the truck.....truck was responding great last week..but last few days kick down now seems longer when pushing it...how do u know if its a TRANSMISSION issue..

better wording now ;)

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kick down now seems longer when pushing it...how do u know if its a tranny issue.
If s/he gets too loose before bottoming out.
 

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You can usually tell a bad tranny by hairy legs, crooked boobs, and the five o'clock shadow.

On the xterra, what is the condition of the fluid? Maint history? Mileage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
You can usually tell a bad tranny by hairy legs, crooked boobs, and the five o'clock shadow.

On the xterra, what is the condition of the fluid? Maint history? Mileage?
153000km..so 95000 miles..
all diff. trans. oils changed three years ago...
regular maintenance engine oil etc. also did the timing chain repair
and did that whole radiator by pass thing to avoid a antifreeze leak into transmission etc.
 

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you can tell a bad tranmission just by sitting in the drivers seat....look at shifter......is there a "P" anywhere on it?
 

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Start by checking your transmission fluid. The dipstick is just to the left as you stand facing the engine bay. It will be back fairly close to the back of the engine bay and will be tucked down in a little bit. The cap to the dipstick has a 10mm bolt holding it on so a ratchet and extension would be your friend.

Get the dipstick out, check the fluid a couple times and make sure you are using a clean, lint free white rag. By using the white rag you'll get a decent idea for what color the ATF is, but also check while it's still on the dipstick.

That's the very first thing you should be doing right now. You're already bypassed so you're not looking for coolant in the transmission (milkshake substance and brown/red) BUT you are looking for black/brown ATF and actually even smelling it to see if it smells really burned.

.......also, can you be a bit more descriptive? Not really sure what "sound and feeling while pushing the truck" means. Kind of hard to relate that to...anything really. I wrote the above out so you can go ahead and check anyway.
 

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You're supposed to check it with the engine running.
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Ansd the transmission has to be at normal operating temp.
 

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The dipstick has a HOT and COLD marker (on different sides).

If you measure using the COLD side, the engine must be running and the temperature should be up around 120F or higher.

If you measure using the HOT side, the engine must be running and the temperature should be at 176F.

Must be on level ground blah blah blah.....


I really wasn't intending for the guy to check ATF levels...that's oh him. If the ATF is burned or contaminated right now to the point that it's noticeably driving differently then it's really not going to matter one way or the other if the truck is running. Just pull the dipstick and see what the ATF looks like.
 

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I started getting some funny feelings about the shifting performance of my transmission during light-throttled 0-70 (getting on the highway) launches and when dropping the throttle 100% for a pass, etc. Just had a bit of a skip in the beat compared to the normal silky smooth constant wheel-power shifts I'd always been used to in the 2nd gen transmission performance.

I tore into my air intake last weekend, pulled out the MAF sensor in the intake tube, saw a good bit of dirt caked on the tiny electronic component sensors. Sprayed it down a few times letting it dry between spray-downs with MAF sensor cleaner spray.

I also cleaned out the throttle body, front and rear of the butterfly as well as I could with carb/choke cleaner. Lots of greasy dirt came out onto my paper towels.

Throttle body being clean, and the MAF sensor being as clean as factory spec is important for judgement the transmission makes for shifting. Driving through the past week, I can immediately feel a difference in shifting performance. Feels silky-smooth at 103k miles under light throttle and heavy throttle.

Running an oiled air filter calls for doing these cleanings more often as oily residue seeps into the air intake over time from your filter, but running a regular paper filter doesn't mean your MAF and throttle body won't get dirty. Running a K&N filter on my 2001 Isuzu rodeo resulted in the same thing. Once the MAF sensor and throttle body butterfly began to get a bit gunked, the transmissions shifts seems a bit off-sync. Cleaning it up resulted in it working like new again.

My transmission fluid from the dipstick is leaning more toward a golden light oily color than being red. Must be time for another PMF soon.
 

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Check your transmission's permanent record, police record if any, and then tempt it with an easy crime. If it has a bad record or takes the bait, then it is probably a bad transmission and needs to put in a time out.
 
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