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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Let me preface this by saying that I do not own an actual Hi-Lift jack, I have a cheaper farm jack. But they look the same in photos, so this build should still work for you, or require little modification.

This mount can be built in about an hour (not counting paint drying), and costs around $20 in parts (the HiLift version is $55 on Amazon). Mount will attach cleanly to a stock X roof rack side rail. Here's a pic of the finished product in action:

I have a 60" jack, so I built mine with 3 mount locations. This can easily be changed to 2 or 4 mounts by simply adding/subtracting one of each hardware item, depending on your desires and strength needs. It is very strong the way I have it.

List of parts you will need to purchase:
3x 2" exhaust pipe clamps (try an auto parts store, the rest can be found at a hardware store)
3x 3/8 x 1.5" stainless steel carriage bolts
3x 3/8 stainless hex nuts
3x 3/8 stainless wing nuts
3x 3/8 stainless lock washers
3x 3/8 x 1" stainless fender washers
Spray paint or bedliner in desired color
Some carb cleaner or oil stripping equivalent

List of tools:
Drill with steel capable 3/8" bit
9/16" socket and box wrench (a combination wrench could work as well)

To start, drill a 3/8" hole directly in the center of the top of each pipe clamp. I recommend using a starting punch to line up the bit, to avoid getting far off center. I would also recommend using a grinder or file to soften the inner and outer corners of the clamp, so that they don't catch on stuff. It should look like this (after powder coat):


Next, paint or bedline the parts that you want colored. Be sure to clean all of the oil off of the pipe clamps using the carb cleaner before painting them, or nothing will stick. Leaving the stainless hardware and chrome clamp nuts bare will end with a cleaner look, since not even bedliner will stay on threads when the nuts are tightened. I chose to just powder coat the clamps black and leave the rest clean. You will have to set these parts aside for a couple days so they can fully dry.

Here's the fun part: Use a hacksaw or sawzall to cut the round head off of the carriage bolts. The square center will fit nicely inside the clamp channel without protruding past the clamp's curve. Your result should look like this:


Now, feed the bolt through the hole you drilled in the clamp, square end on the inside so that it sits in the clamp channel. Tighten the hex nut on top. Result will look like this:


You're ready to install the mounts. Be aware that twisting the clamp while on the roof rack may scratch your aluminum tube. Once installed, it should look something like this:


Leave the clamp nuts on 2 clamps somewhat loose to align with your jack. Carefully lift your jack over the mounting screws, gently changing the orientation of the other 2 clamps to match the jack and stay parallel to the roof rack. Once in place, remove jack and tighten clamp nuts. Put the jack back on the mount, slide the fender washer and then lock washer on top of each bolt, then cap with the wing nut. You're good to go!

As you can see in the first photo, I have added a locking cable to mine for security. It was kinda hard to fab a cable that short, so I'd recommend using a cable gun lock (called an action lock) instead. Final note, it is probably safer to mount the jack to the passenger side rail than the drivers side. This way if the mounts shear in an accident, the jack won't fly into oncoming traffic. (Thanks for the tip, Surf and Snow!) Happy trails! :wave:
 

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The idea is good in theory, but if I may add some criticisms out of concern for safety:

Those little bitty 6mm bolts are scketchy weak on shear strength. I'd be very concerned about those snapping like toothpicks in the event you rear end someone. That thing will still keep going at 60 mph. Your lock cable might save it on the bright side. But, that combined with being on the driver side (the dangerous side due to ability to kill another driver if a lane is crossed) makes this a bit scary man. Might want to switch to some 3/8" or at least 5/16" bolts, and consider switching it to the passenger side. Just saying.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The idea is good in theory, but if I may add some criticisms out of concern for safety:

Those little bitty 6mm bolts are scketchy weak on shear strength. I'd be very concerned about those snapping like toothpicks in the event you rear end someone. That thing will still keep going at 60 mph. Your lock cable might save it on the bright side. But, that combined with being on the driver side (the dangerous side due to ability to kill another driver if a lane is crossed) makes this a bit scary man. Might want to switch to some 3/8" or at least 5/16" bolts, and consider switching it to the passenger side. Just saying.
Eventually I'm planning to switch to 5/16, but that will require grinding the head down some to make it fit the channel so it's not part of the "simple" version. Honestly didn't think about the driver's side thing, good point.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Heavy Editing

The idea is good in theory, but if I may add some criticisms out of concern for safety:

Those little bitty 6mm bolts are scketchy weak on shear strength. I'd be very concerned about those snapping like toothpicks in the event you rear end someone. That thing will still keep going at 60 mph. Your lock cable might save it on the bright side. But, that combined with being on the driver side (the dangerous side due to ability to kill another driver if a lane is crossed) makes this a bit scary man. Might want to switch to some 3/8" or at least 5/16" bolts, and consider switching it to the passenger side. Just saying.
I've upgraded to 3/8" hardware and modified the instructions to match the new sizes, plus changing mount side. Take another look!
 

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Sorry to resurrect an old howto....but great write-up with lots off pics! Much appreciated.
Only question is this.....why start with a carriage bolt only to cut it into a hex bolt? Why not start with a hex bolt to begin with?
 
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