Second Generation Nissan Xterra Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey Old Navy, can we have a new forum titled Fucking Mother Fucking Piece of Shit Bastard Ass God Damned Mother Fucking Rust!!! Just a sugestion.

Lessons learned:

  1. When knocking, scraping, and wire brushing rust from the underside of your truck, be very careful not to bump any rusty hydraulic lines.
  2. Always have a bucket or drain pan within reach when working anywhere near any rusty hydraulic lines. Kitty litter or kwik 'sorb is handy to have at the ready too. The small amount of fluid in the clutch section of the reservoir does not look so small in a puddle on your garage floor.
  3. When dealing with rusty hydraulic lines, particularly those in and around the wheel wells, the fasteners, fittings, retainers, and mounting hardware will also be rusty. Be prepared for every single bolt head and nut to either shear off or round.
  4. Invest in good set of flare nut wrenches. Combination wrenches could equally be known as flare nut rounders.
  5. When replacing hydraulic lines, cut out only the bad section and insert a screw type coupler. Do not go and remove the entire line. The little plastic clips that hold those lines to the body will break just to spite you.
  6. When replacing rusty hydraulic lines, dont bump the other rusty hydraulic lines that are next to them. Dejavu is that much more unpleasant when the repeated event was very unpleasant.
  7. When you decide to order all the sections of a line from the dealer to make it as neat and easy as possible to replace what you have botched up, speak very clearly on the phone and have the parts guy repeat the part numbers back to you. Do not expect him to realize or care that the part number he is writing down is the same as the last one you just gave him. Additionally, if two part numbers you are ordering are varied by only one digit, point that out and make sure the parts guy understands you are ordering two very different parts.
  8. Do not expect the guy behind the parts counter to have any intelligence or to care one bit about you and your situation.
  9. Do not expect the dealer to stock common items like fitting washers and hose clips.
  10. When the dealer has screwed you and now you need to dive into the deep dark world of DIY tube flaring, do your research and watch all the YouTube videos you can find before you start, not after.
  11. When flaring for the first time, cut some small pieces of scrap and screw those up instead of the 5 foot long piece you just painstakingly bent into the shape of the original.
  12. Flare first and then bend. Once you have painstakingly bent your second line and realize you dont have enough room after the final bend for the tube nut and the flaring tool, unbending is not an option.
  13. 25 feet of bulk tube goes fast when you have to keep starting over on a 5 foot piece.
  14. Do not trust loaner tools from the auto parts stores. Even when brand new they are likely to be bent or something and make you feel like you are more of an incompetent idiot than you give yourself credit for.
  15. Drop the coin on a high quality flare tool set. Don't monkey around with a moderately priced kit and walk away from anything under 50 bucks.
  16. Invest in a tubing bender. Kinking the tube is surprisingly easy to do.
  17. There is a veritable myriad of tube nut varieties. Maybe by the 4th visit to the parts store you will have the right one.
  18. 25 feet of bulk tube really does go surprisingly fast when you are an incompetent idiot.
  19. Improperly flared connections leak. A lot. Do not use too much force on your flaring tool.
  20. OMG that 25' went fast!!
  21. Improperly aligned connections leak. A lot. Make sure the tube seats properly in the connector before screwing in the tube nut. Make sure the tube is going straight in to the connection so that the tube nut screws in easily. Watch the youtube videos that tell you this before you leave more brake fluid on the floor, not after.
  22. Newly flared connections that have not been loosened and tightened again 2 to 3 times leak. A lot. Watch more YouTube videos that explain this before you start, not after you have exhausted your kitty litter supply on all the brake fluid on the floor.
  23. If you think you only need one bottle of brake fluid get two, one for the system and one for the floor.
  24. When bleeding the hydraulic clutch, keep checking all of your connections. Those that aren't leaking yet will. A lot. And you are out of kitty liter.
  25. Towards the end of the bleeding process there will be a good deal of pressure built up behind the bleeder screw. Hold on to your bleeder tube tight and wrap with a rag. A bleeder tube being blown off the screw when you open it makes a mess. A lot. And brake fluid is not very tasty when it splashes on your face. And now you are out of paper towels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Nice!!

Were you doing a single flare on the tubing or a double flare? I've done brake lines and it's always a double flare and it works great so I imagine the clutch lines are about the same size and material so I'd be double flaring those most definitely! If you didn't double flare then I'm pretty certain that's why they are leaking after tightening, as long as they are straight on the fitting that is, which can require a little wiggling as you tighten the last bit.

I have a cheapish set that I got from an autoparts store a decade (or two decades) ago, works decent if you're paying attention and follow directions (double flaring can get tricky) but it definitely isn't tool truck quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Were you doing a single flare on the tubing or a double flare? I've done brake lines and it's always a double flare and it works great so I imagine the clutch lines are about the same size and material so I'd be double flaring those most definitely!
The clutch line actually comes off of the brake reservoir and is standard brake tube. I was double flaring. The tool from the parts store was slightly crooked so any time I tried to do the first flare it would just go cockeyed. Making sure they were seated properly and retigtening them good and tight a couple times then all was good. Up until the bleeder hose blew off of the slave cylinder of course. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
The clutch line actually comes off of the brake reservoir and is standard brake tube. I was double flaring. The tool from the parts store was slightly crooked so any time I tried to do the first flare it would just go cockeyed. Making sure they were seated properly and retigtening them good and tight a couple times then all was good. Up until the bleeder hose blew off of the slave cylinder of course. :rolleyes:
Lol, I think I used one of the check valve bleeder things so I can do it all myself. The hose on it is darn tight and since the system doesn't have time to pressurize, it hasn't blown off yet. Had to pull the clutch pedal off the floor a few times though when I bled that system sometime 6 years ago or so.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top