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Cleaning

I was going to clean the TB, but didn't have coolant on hand to re-fill my rad after draining to get the TB off. Ill get the TB cleaned on the next rad flush.
I never drain my radiator to clean my Throttle Body. There are 2 hoses on the bottom of the Throttle Body, the one on the left is the one that spits out radiator fluid. I usually just stick a bolt into the hose opening to stop the fluid from coming out. The right hose will have some fluid that comes out but not enough to evan make a difference. The book is more of a guideline and this site has all the shortcuts needed to make your job much easier, I'd take experience over a book anyday, hope this helps.
 

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Nice write up, I just did mine today. Just FYI as others said, I didn't remove anything and used a few extensions, worked like a charm..


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Exactly this. ^^

I did mine today. I didn't have to disconnect the electric connectors either, except for one that was easily accessed in front of the front/right cylinder that gave the wire to that coil just enough extra slop to allow the coil/boot to be finagled out. All the rest had enough slop in the wires to allow the coils to be removed as is.

Thank You for this thread. It saved me a bunch of time. :)
 

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so i joined the club of DIY spark plugs replacement.

I DID remove the manifold. It just made a lot easier and hassle free.

In general I would say it is a "medium" difficulty job using the right tools. Took around 2.5 hrs (including some time wasting trying to get out the wrench which fell in between the radiator and the front grill)

I did however "guesstimate" the right torquing for the manifold and all other bolts. I have tendency to overtorque :)... i broke a "non essential" bolt holding the bracket behind the manifold (can't bench press and tighten bolts).

Also I noticed how much the fine sand of the desert got into very "sensitive" places... I didn't have a suitable vacuum to take it out, so kept it in place.... anyway it will get in again.. But i am hoping the new manifold gasket will get it out the air stream.

BTW, i have 80000 KM on the odo... donno if bit premature change of the plugs... anyway already done :D
 

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I've had the cyl #1 coil around 4 times in the last month and a half and found a few short cuts. I had used the extensions with wobble joints method in the distant past but the head on the bolt holding the coil for cyl #1 is starting to round off. My son has also grown and moved away for college so it no longer works to ask him to stick his hand in to remove and install the bolt on the coil for cyl #1.

The following comments apply if you are only replacing plugs and/or coils. If you are going to work on the injectors or other parts, you will have to do what roguebuck described.

A) It is not necessary to completely remove the plastic intake.
B) It is not necessary to unbolt the metal bracket on the back that holds the bit wiring harness. It is also not necessary to disconnect the grey connector on the metal bracket.
C) It is not necessary to disconnect the hose that connects from the PCV valve on the back of the passenger side valve cover.
d) It is not necessary to disconnect the hose to the brake booster.


The short cuts are:

1) After removing the bolt at the very back of the intake, use a pair of pliers to release the two retainers that hold the big wiring harness on the metal bracket at the back of the manifold. Push the wiring harness toward the firewall enough that the manifold can be lifted straight up.
2) Once all the intake fasteners are out (5 bolts + 2 nuts on top and 2 bolts under intake runner). Use two large screwdrivers and pry upwards on the drivers side edge of the manifold. The intake must be lifted vertically. If it is lifted at an angle, it will jam on the studs on top. You may have to push the wiring harness towards the firewall more.
3) When the intake is lifted high enough, insert a spacer under the drivers side edge of the intake from the drivers side. Be careful not to damage the manifold seals that should be stuck to the underside of the intake. Insert a second spacer between the bottom of the intake runner and the top of the metal bracket on the passenger side. The spacers need to be about 1" to 1 1/2" thick. I used a short piece of 2 x 4 under the intake runner and a short piece of 1 x 2 furring strip.

This now allows sufficient space to stick your hand in under the intake runner to work on the coil and plug for cyl #1.

4) Remove the bolt holding down the coil for cyl #1 then pull the coil up about an inch before removing the connector from the coil. The latch for the connector is blocked otherwise.

5) When reinstalling the coil for cyl #1, drop the coil into the hole in the valve cover. Do not push it to the side as it goes in or you might crack it and cause a failure (misfire) later, like I did. Pull it back out about 1" to 1 1/2" and hold it in that position with one hand. Plug the connector on the coil with your other hand. Do a "pull test" to ensure that the connector is properly latched onto the coil. Do this by pulling on the connector shell, never by the wires. If it is not properly latched, it can make an acceptable connection then work loose later and cause a misfire. After ensuring the plug is properly latched onto the coil, push the coil straight down onto the plug and reinstall the bolt holding it onto the valve cover.

Hope that helps!
 

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well noted thanks for the comments.

Honestly i liked the fact that i didn't take shortcuts this time :)... i always have this thing in my mind that i need to do the least "unbolting" possible to avoid anything going wrong...

however i will end up spending more time trying to complete the job, without properly preparing for it...

anyway now the job is done... i have also replaced the manifold and throttle body gaskets... feels good and right to do so.
 

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Did mine yesterday. I did remove the upper intake. THe back connector I just slid off the bracket and removed the wire harness from the bracket. The throttle body I removed and left hanging. I wanted to completely remove the intake and check the gaskets. Its easy as pie once you get the intake off.
 

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I remember pulling the plugs on my 2013 Xterra and cursing and swearing thinking it was a stupid design to make a simple job as a plug change so involved and difficult. Ha ha I just did a plug change yesterday on my Toyota Sienna van and THAT was so bloody insane and difficult it makes the Xterra job look like a dream! On the positive side of things though, the spark plugs nowadays last really long and don't need changing like they used to.
 

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I can attest that all plugs can be changed without unbolting the intake or removing engine parts, but it does require wobblers, extensions and small hands.

I am glad the change interval is 105,000 miles. My inclination is to sell my X before the next plug change at 210,000 miles. Hopefully Ford will get its act together and release the new Bronco before then. :)
 

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Blasphemy! :)
Perhaps to some, but our '05's are now 15-years-old and the Xterra ceased production 5 years ago. Its been a good run but our rigs won't last forever. The new Bronco may be a decent replacement when the time finally comes.

Don't get me wrong, my Xterra has served me well. It just carried me 4,146 miles to Cabo San Lucas and back without a hiccup and I have no doubt that it would do it again. At almost 149,000 miles it feels barely broken in.
 

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Perhaps to some, but our '05's are now 15-years-old and the Xterra ceased production 5 years ago. Its been a good run but our rigs won't last forever. The new Bronco may be a decent replacement when the time finally comes.

Don't get me wrong, my Xterra has served me well. It just carried me 4,146 miles to Cabo San Lucas and back without a hiccup and I have no doubt that it would do it again. At almost 149,000 miles it feels barely broken in.
Pfft. 149K. hardly broken in. You need to keep it at least 2 years anyway, unless you wish to be a beta tester of the year 1 bronco.
 

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Perhaps to some, but our '05's are now 15-years-old and the Xterra ceased production 5 years ago. Its been a good run but our rigs won't last forever.
I hear you. Just joshin ya.

I have given myself the personal challenge of trying to make my Xterra(s) last forever, but we'll see. My 05 has 238K miles on it and has been retired from daily use to help keep the miles down. My 15 has only 7K on it. So hopefully between the two, I'm covered for at least another 10 or 15 years. :)
 
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