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2005 Xterra Alternator Rebuild

There at least two different alternators in the 2005 Xterra (I am not sure about the 06-07). This alternator rebuild is from an alternator out of an OR model. Other models should be similar.

Rebuilding an alternator is simple, but just like anything, things can go wrong. If you decide to use this how-to and something does goes wrong, don't blame me.

Tools Needed:

Impact Wrench (breaker bar might work)
Strap Wrench
Sockets: 24mm, 18mm, 10mm, 8mm
Ratchet
Small Gear Puller
Flat Head Screw Driver
Hammer (Deadblow works best)
Small piece of stiff wire (coat hanger)
Wooden Block
600 grit wet/dry sand paper
Penetrating oil (PB Blaster)


Disassembly:

1. Hit the pulley nut with penetrating oil and let sit (few hours / over night)
2. Place the strap wrench around the pulley making sure it’s the right direction to grab while removing the nut.
3. Using a 24mm socket and impact wrench, remove the pulley nut.
4. If needed, use a small gear puller to remove the pulley. (mine fell right off)
5. Turn the alternator over and remove the four (4) long bolts holding the housing together.
6. Using a hammer and working your way around, lightly tap the front half of the housing off.
7. Slowly and carefully remove the rotor from the housing (the rear bearing will come out as well).
8. Using an 8mm socket, remove the five (5) nuts from the back of the alternator.
9. Remove the plastic cover on the back, next to the positive terminal.
10. Using a 10mm socket remove the nut that was under the cover.
11. Using a hammer and working your way around, lightly tap the rear half of the housing off.
12. Using a flat head screw driver remove the three (3) screws from the back side of the front housing.
13. Remove the bearing plate.
14. Lay the front housing face up on a flat solid surface.
15. Using an 18mm socket (or proper sized piece of pipe) and a hammer drive the bearing out.
16. Using a small gear puller, remove the rear bearing from the rotor shaft (careful you do not damage the sliprings).


Cleaning

1. Using a wet piece of 600 grit sand paper (I use penetrating oil instead of water), polish the slip rings. They do not have to be perfect, just remove and dirt, grime and major scaring. Do this by wrapping the piece of sand paper all the way around both slip rings and turning the rotor in one direction. (I used a small table lathe to turn the rotor, but it can be turned by hand.)
2. Using a non-corrosive cleaner clean all parts. (I use a bucket of water and simple green, along with a soft tooth brush). Be careful with the brushes, sliprings and windings.
3. Rinse all parts well and let dry.

***Note: I ended up using a small sand blaster picked up at Harbor Freight for $10 to clean all the parts. This worked better than just simple green and water.


Assembly:

1. Insert the new bearing into the end housing. Using an appropriate sized socked and hammer, tap the bearing into place.
2. Insert the new bearing into the front housing. Using an appropriate sized socket and hammer, tap the bearing into place.
3. Reinstall the bearing retainer plate using the three screws. Tighten screws.
4. Check the movement of the brushes. They should slid in and out freely and not get hung up or stuck. If this happens take extra care in cleaning them out.
5. Push the brushes in and insert the small piece of stiff wire into the hole to hold them back.
6. Carefully place the rotor inside the windings and remove the wire to release the brushes.
7. Carefully slide the end housing on, making sure the rotor does not push forward and the brushes fall off the slip rings.
8. Place shaft spacer on the front shaft of the rotor.
9. Carefully slide the front housing on and line up both the mounting tabs and the bolt holes.
10. Install the 4 long bolts....

That is as far as I have got so far. I am waiting for the new bearings to come in. I also have pictures that I will post later as well.
 

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TXterra37 said:
I have an 05, too. The alternator already needs rebuilding!?
Souldn't, unless it is a pirce of crap. The alternator on my 1983 King Cab Frontier lasted 8 years and about 200,000 miles before it died and was rebuilt by a little filipino alternator shop in Olongapo City, PH for about 77 Pesos.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yep, I rebuilt one already and I'll be replacing my current one with a rebuilt one and then rebuilding it too.

Problem is out alternator is the lowest point on the engine and likes to suck up mud.

It's not that it stops working, but the bearings go bad.
 

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Muzikman said:
Yep, I rebuilt one already and I'll be replacing my current one with a rebuilt one and then rebuilding it too.

Problem is our alternator is the lowest point on the engine and likes to suck up mud.

It's not that it stops working, but the bearings go bad.
"WHAT, Another design problem." What's going on with this vehicle, was it designed by want tobe engineers with little or no knowledge on off-roading or what???? You can't take in any water deeper then 3 feet for fear of fring your electrical systems or flooding out your rear axle, you can't do any exterme rock crawling for fear of breaking your rear and/or front differentals, I mean god, this is getting really ridiculous.
 

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I opened my alternator today on my 2005 offroad. Bad bearings again. Part numbers are: WBD 6303D which is 17x47x14 and 6303-2RSJ is the SKF number. the other (back one) was NSK B10-50D which is 10x27x11 and AB7 is the SKF number. If it can help someone one day...
 
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