Second Generation Nissan Xterra Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So how does the limited slip work on my 2010 Xterra X (2 wheel drive)? I'm puzzled that it seems to work pretty well on the exceedingly rare occasions when we get snow/ice in Atlanta, but not well at all in mud. It seems that I'm less likely to get stuck in mud if I turn the stability control off.

Is there a clutch pack in there that is controlled electronically? Is the computer also cutting engine power? Just trying to understand why it seems ineffective in mud, as I'm using the Xterra now to haul dirt bikes (hitch carrier), so muddy roads in the woods are a regular occurrence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
So how does the limited slip work on my 2010 Xterra X (2 wheel drive)? I'm puzzled that it seems to work pretty well on the exceedingly rare occasions when we get snow/ice in Atlanta, but not well at all in mud. It seems that I'm less likely to get stuck in mud if I turn the stability control off.

Is there a clutch pack in there that is controlled electronically? Is the computer also cutting engine power? Just trying to understand why it seems ineffective in mud, as I'm using the Xterra now to haul dirt bikes (hitch carrier), so muddy roads in the woods are a regular occurrence.
You don't have a limited slip, see this thread:


Your ABLS system is going to work better in snow and ice, when it's helpful to cut power by braking. The VDC might have also kicked in to help keep you on track.

In the mud, it's often more helpful to let the wheels spin a bit and clear them out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
OK thanks! That makes sense. I'll keep the VDC off and focus on carrying a bit of momentum in the muddy spots. I'm really liking the Xterra for motorcycle hauling, but I think I've gotten stuck more in the last 9 months with this 2wd Xterra than I have in the previous 20+ years of 2wd open differential pick up trucks. I believe the auto trans is throwing me off as well, as I'm just having a hard time "feeling" what the rear wheels are doing. My previous trucks have all been manuals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,684 Posts
ABLS
4-wheel Limited Slip (ABLS)
In most situations, a spinning wheel is a bad thing. Which is why Xterra 4x4s offer 4-wheel Limited Slip (ABLS). The system senses (a) drive wheel(s) spinning, then automatically applies the brakes to the slipping wheel(s) and directs power to the drive wheel(s) with the best traction. (4x2 models feature 2-wheel Limited Slip.

ABLS in action with Nissan Titan

 
  • Like
Reactions: Leonard4X4

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
VDC is great on snowy roads. More than a limited slip, it looks at steering angle (to tell where you want to go), Yaw sensor to tell if you are actually getting what you are asking for, with ABS and traction control all rolled into one. Too much throttle in a turn, it is going to cut power and selectively apply brakes to do the best it can to keep you going where you were intending to go.

With the VDC off you can treat it a lot like an old school car and get wheel speed, do doughnuts in the parking lot. If you punch the throttle on a snowy freeway on ramp it will let you spin out and tag the gaurdrail. So it is best to leave it on most of the time.

So bombing through mud puddles. You will want the limits turned off so you can get your wheel speed and not have the computer cutting throttle trying to keep you from spinning out. That is why they give you the switch. Once you are back on the good roads, turn it back on. You only want it off when you are expecting lots of tire slip and can plan your driving for it. Normal day to day driving it is a great thing to have.

The people who think they can drive better than the computer can, have a huge ego and can't admit that the computer is better than they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I think the best argument for VDC is that upon entry into any given variety of motor sport, it results in HUGE reductions in lap times, cries of "foul" from the have nots, and immediate bans and/or regulation by the sanctioning body.

It's also a great help for daily drivers. I only buy manual transmission cars for my own use, and for situations that used to require some clutch/throttle skill ( like having to make a quick left or right turn from a stop on a wet road as traffic approaches), these days I just mash the throttle and dump the clutch, and let the computer take over. All I have to do is steer---it's great! My 22-year-old son has learned clutch and throttle control like I did from racing motorcycles, but he has never driven a car where you might need those skills, except for maybe a couple of times when he borrowed my old truck.

But VDC can be intrusive. I recently drove my Ford ST to the north GA mountains for some spirited driving on mountain roads. I stupidly forgot to reset the VDC to one of the sport modes when I got there. It only took a few minutes of driving before my brake pedal turned to mush on the floor from nanny intrusion and I had to pull over and wait for things to cool. But in one of the car's sport modes it would take far more skill than I would ever have to overwhelm the brakes.

I guess muddy spots are just one of those areas where the VDC is a bit too intrusive for my 2wd X. I've got to get into the habit of turning the VDC off when I come to a muddy spot and using a little more momentum to get through. And when it doesn't make it, I've got the recovery hook from the 4wd model bolted up and ready for use:)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top