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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to try some multi day off road excursions, and was mentally compiling all the gear that I would have to carry in the X. I guess I'd have a tent, mattress (air), sleeping bag(s), clothes, food, water, stove, cooking equipment, pillow, recovery gear, tools....and probably a bunch more. Well, I'm sure all of this would fit, but what's the best way to secure everything, so while I'm wheel'n it doesn't all come crashing down on my head? Is it best to use cargo nets? Bungee cords? Our floor tie down points don't look like they're in the ideal position to use a tie downs when the rear is loaded.

Rob
 

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I don't think there is any one way that works for all situations. I have a couple of different sets of stuff that I regularly haul and I tie them down completely different from each other.

For one particular group of stuff, it works really well to slide one set of lash points as far to the rear of the vehicle as they will go and then secure the other end to the points in the back of the rear seats using bungee cords. Another set of gear works better if I use the ceiling points and cross it up in the back with mesh straps.

I have also found occasions where it worked really well to put a carabiner in one of the floor points. This allowed me to pass through that point and onto a third position with the same strap instead of having to use two straps.

It really is all about the load in question and what works.

Two other thoughts:
#1 The less stuff you have the better, so try and consolidate into duffel bags, storage boxes, etc.
#2 - Things like sleeping bags can compress so don't put a strap over a solid object, like a cooler, with a sleeping bag on top. Eventually the bag could compress enough to allow the strap to work loose.
 

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For long trips I have a few Pelican cases that work great. You can stack them and then strap them down. They're backed by a lifetime warranty too. If at any point, you break them, they get replaced free of charge. They're just a little pricey, but you get what you pay for.




 

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Dude...I had NO idea that is what you bring with you when we head out on trips. Anything I have ever said that has upset you I am so sorry for.
 

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If you are worried about creating a cargo area full of projectiles...get a roof basket and store what gear you can up there. Stuff won't ever smack you in the head when its on the roof.
 

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Erick said:
Dude...I had NO idea that is what you bring with you when we head out on trips. Anything I have ever said that has upset you I am so sorry for.
:sign5:
 

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I've got a 50cal round with "Eric" written on it in my own blood...
:)

No, those photos were from Expedition Exchange. I was too lazy to get out my camera, go into my garage, and upload photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Lyrex said:
I don't think there is any one way that works for all situations. I have a couple of different sets of stuff that I regularly haul and I tie them down completely different from each other.

For one particular group of stuff, it works really well to slide one set of lash points as far to the rear of the vehicle as they will go and then secure the other end to the points in the back of the rear seats using bungee cords. Another set of gear works better if I use the ceiling points and cross it up in the back with mesh straps.

I have also found occasions where it worked really well to put a carabiner in one of the floor points. This allowed me to pass through that point and onto a third position with the same strap instead of having to use two straps.

It really is all about the load in question and what works.

Two other thoughts:
#1 The less stuff you have the better, so try and consolidate into duffel bags, storage boxes, etc.
#2 - Things like sleeping bags can compress so don't put a strap over a solid object, like a cooler, with a sleeping bag on top. Eventually the bag could compress enough to allow the strap to work loose.
Thanks for the info. I guess I'll have to try different methods to see what works best at the time. Storage boxes or duffel bags sounds like a good idea!

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #11
syndicate said:
For long trips I have a few Pelican cases that work great. You can stack them and then strap them down. They're backed by a lifetime warranty too. If at any point, you break them, they get replaced free of charge. They're just a little pricey, but you get what you pay for.
Those boxes look freak'n heavy duty.

Dude, what are you guys doing down there?...running guns across the border?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
VanX said:
If you are worried about creating a cargo area full of projectiles...get a roof basket and store what gear you can up there. Stuff won't ever smack you in the head when its on the roof.
Yeah, that might be in my future plans. But, I haven't done much off road'n yet and don't know to what extend I'll be ablee to in the future.


Rob
 

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I used a lot of those pelican cases when i went somewhere with the military. they are a lot better then what the military usually puts rifles in.
 

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How much do those cases run? They look pretty sweet. I have always used those oversized tupperware from Target or something.

But I too vote for boxes. Much easier to carry and storing not only in your car but where ever you store your gear when you're not using it.

Just a little side joke but Syndicate I really love that shrockbumper man. Really!
 

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I second Pelican Cases. I use them for my camera gear and would be lost without them. Also, they are weatherproof which is REALLY nice. Super strong and lifetime warranty. They also stack on top of each other well.
 

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Another storage idea that works well, but not as solid as the Pelicans, is the Action Packer box from Rubbermaid (I think). They are fairly solid. I use 2 or 3 of those for most stuff, and when I sleep in the truck they can just sit outside on the ground and keep things dry or dust free.

I usually just leave foam pads and sleeping bags loose in the back, they are pretty soft and light.

You might want to pick up an assortment of lashing straps and ratchet straps that way you can configure as you need.

A Raingler ceiling net is handy, you can keep soft stuff up there without blocking visibility. I prefer the soft net to the hard shelf mod as it's easier on the head if you smack into it when moving around in the back.
 

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SoCalXterra said:
How much do those cases run?......
They're on the pricey side but they're worth every cent.

Frank brought up a great point. The 8gal Action Packers from Rubbermade can be used to increase your sleeping area in the back. See "Sleeping in the back of the Xterra", or a similarly titled post for a more detailed explanation.
 

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If all the stuff is going to fit in the back with the seats up. I would look at a pet divider to keep stuff back. I would ratchet strap any of the heavier items to the utili-track.

I use a large plastic crate strapped to the floor for my recovery gear. I wish I was rich enough to use Pelican cases. ;)
 

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muzikman said:
...I wish I was rich enough to use Pelican cases. ;)
Well that's what E-Bay is for. With pelican cases you can get them for about half price and they still hold their lifetime guarantee.
 

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For small items like one bag or two, I hook a carabiner to the bag and just latch that to the utiltrack hooks on the floor, then the bag doesn't slide to much. For larger stuff I just bungee and ratchet strap it to death.

Also if you pack it well, things won't slide or move near as much.
 
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