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Odd, the service manual doesn't tell you either.

I am pretty sure 12oz isn't going to be enough though to properly bleed the system.
 

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It's as easy as sticking 4 short lengths of tube to each bleed valve on the calipers, dropping the other end into 4 containers. Opening up each bleed valve. Bump break pedal until all the fluid is out.

Or you can go the route of using a bleeder pump and go around to each bleed valve and suck the fluid out. This actually works a little better as it gets more fluid out.

Then refill and bleed the brakes.
 

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That's about it. But the first bleed is a little more than bleeding, it's more of an empty, fill, bleed, fill, bleed.
 

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so..no special consideration for the abs? If it bleeds straight thru, then it should be easy. I change mine every time I do brakes (3 or 4 years) with standard duty oem type replacement just to keep the moisture out of the system.

it's a good idea since a lot of people worry too much about the motor oil and not the rest of the car. coolant and brake fluid are my every 3 yr maint. items.
 

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brake bleeding

Without any special equipment, here is how I do it.
(1) remove as much old fluid from master cylinder- I use a turkey baster that I have just for brake fluid.
(2) refill master with fresh fluid from unopened container
(3) place piece of 2 x 4 under brake pedal to prevent pedal from going to floor.
(4) starting with the wheel farthest from master, install piece of plastic tubing on bleeder, other end into clean bottle, open bleeder and pump pedal slowly until clean fluid comes out of tubing. This is usually about 12 pumps.
(5) proceed to do this with other wheels, checking and refilling master after each- you don't want the master cylinder to run dry.
(6) after all wheels are bled, master cylinder topped off, check for leaks by putting full pressure on pedal and holding.

I usually use 1 1/2 to 2 containers of brake fluid and do this every 2 years. It takes about 1/2 to 1 hour depending on if I need to remove the wheels or not. Some vehicles can be done with it on jackstands and the wheels left on, others need to have the wheels off to get to the bleeders.

A point about the bleeders- if they are rusty they are prone to breaking so I usually spray them with a rust buster and tap them with a hammer and gently apply a wrench or socket. If they seem difficult, I repeat the spray and hammer and wait, sometimes overnight. If you break a bleeder, you may be lucky and extract it but then, again, you may end up having to replace a caliper.
 
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