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Discussion Starter #1
I finished putting my ranchos on along with my AC lift. But now i need to extend the brake lines. I purchased a set of longer brake lines but I have NO IDEA how to swap them out. do i have to totally bleed the brake fluid then replace them? do i just swap them out as quickly a possible so I dont loose all my brake fluid (that was a joke)?

Also, it suggests relocation of ABS lines. Did anyone do this, or did you replace those too.

Pictures would help. Thanks in advance!!! :thumbup:
 

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For the extended break lines you just remove the orginal lines. Watch out for the fluid because it will go everywhere. Then install the new ones after you wipe clean the fittings. Then bleed ALL the brakes. Start in the rear passenger side, then rear drivers side, then front passengers side, and finally front drivers side.

As for the ABS I think if you remove some clips that will extend it.
 

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Ok, I'll do a quick How-to.

1. Using a wire brush, clean off as much dirt and what not from both ends of the brake line (one end up at the frame, the other end down at the axle).

2. Lay cardboard or news paper or rags (basically anything that catch dripping fluid) on the ground under the brake lines.

2. Using a 10mm (I think it was) line wrench (can be bought at any auto part store) remove one of the lines (both ends). Fluid will drip out, don't worry.

3. Be sure the threads are clean.

4. Install new line. Snug the fittings down with the line wrench.

5. Repeat for other line.

6. Get someone to help you or get a self bleeding brake kit.

7. Get a small bottle of DOT 3 brake fluid.

8. Fill the resevor up to the "MAX" line. Put cap back on.

9. Pump the brakes.

10. Check fluid level. Re-fill if needed.

11. Pump and hold the brakes.

12. Have someone open then close the bleed nut on one wheel to release any air. Do not allow the peddle to reach the floor and to not let up on the peddle while the bleed valve is open.

13. Repeat step 12 until brake fluid flows without bubbles or sputtering.

14. Check fluid level. Re-Fill as needed.

15. Repreat steps 11-14 for the other side.

That should be about it.


As for the ABS cables. I just removed them from their brackets and loosly zip tied them to the brake lines. So far no problems.

Currently my limitation on allowing any more drop (getting longer shocks) are my e-brake cables.
 

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kokopop said:
Start in the rear passenger side, then rear drivers side, then front passengers side, and finally front drivers side.
? ? ? I'm not sure of the order you state ? ? ?

The Service manual recommends (Page BR-10): 1-Front left, 2-Rear left, 3-Front right ...

They also recommend using a "bleeding tube" (to avoid splash in your face).

Regards,
 

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eXTra fORt said:
kokopop said:
Start in the rear passenger side, then rear drivers side, then front passengers side, and finally front drivers side.
? ? ? I'm not sure of the order you state ? ? ?

The Service manual recommends (Page BR-10): 1-Front left, 2-Rear left, 3-Front right ...

They also recommend using a "bleeding tube" (to avoid splash in your face).

Regards,
I could be wrong. Typically you start at the furthest brake from the Master Cylinder and work to the closest.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
okay, i did all that and i took it for a test ride and my breaks are really soft. i nearly have to push the break down all the way to get the truck to stop!!

Please help ! ! !

Should i try to bleed each break line again.
 

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You have air in your system some place. DO NOT drive on any major surface streets until this is corrected. I had that happen after letting a shop do my brake job. I had to take it back after driving a block back to my house. Scary to say the least.
 

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I did a search to prevent re-posting this exact topic. Do I win a cookie or something? After reading the posts, I do however have 3 additional questions.

Any idea how much extending the brake lines would cost if I took it to the dealer or a shop? This looks like something I am capable of doing, but being one man and never done it before I don't want it to take me 3 days to complete. I am willing to pay a reasonable amount for a skilled technician to complete this job for me.

I read that most of you unclipped the ABS lines from their stock brackets, but chose not to extend. Can the ABS lines be extended also? (I imagine they are simply wire cables) I realize most of you didn't think this was needed, but is extending the cable possible?

I didn't read about the parking brake line. Any news on extending that line? Is it not necessary?
 

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Bruzer

Sorry I can't answer your questions but I do hope you don't "break" your lines, but find you can stop your vehicle using your "brakes"! :geek:
 

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If you have a 10mm line wrench and have ever bled brakes before, you can do this mod in less than an hour (you don't even have to jack the truck up in you are small enough.

My guess the dealer will not install the lines for you. I bet any brake shop would though. As to a price, who knows. Less than $100 I am sure.

There is no simple way to extend the ABS lines. I have a few ideas, but I have not really found a need to try any of them.

You could cut the line, solder a piece of wire in and then shrink wrap it. It seemed like too much trouble to me though.
 

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Muzikman said:
If you have a 10mm line wrench and have ever bled brakes before, you can do this mod in less than an hour (you don't even have to jack the truck up in you are small enough.
I don't have the line wrench and never have bled brakes before. I have found anything I do on my own takes 3 or 4 times longer than "normal" or what everyone suggests is normal.

My guess the dealer will not install the lines for you.
This was my guess too.

I bet any brake shop would though. As to a price, who knows. Less than $100 I am sure.
This is a great idea I may stop over to see what they say.

Sorry about misspelling I edited the post to be correct.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Bruizer, I have never done any sort of brake modifications or lifts on a truck. I did this though. The suspension took a long time but the brakes took no time at all. Like my first post said 'i dont know how to do this'. In fact i didnt even know how to bleed the brakes or where the bleeding valves were. I had no real problems. I would do it yourself you cannot mess it up. (knock on wood). [/b]
 

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A 10mm line wrench will cost you $5-$10 at any autopart store (or Sears). The only other tool that you need is a basic metric combo wrench set just to remove the manifold bolt (the brass piece on the end of the new brake lines).

If you are uncomfortable doing it, I would take it to the shop as it is your brakes which are the most importany part of your car.

I do suggest getting a small tool kit and doing some routine maintence and mods yourself. It really lets you learn your car.
 

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Muzikman said:
If you are uncomfortable doing it, I would take it to the shop as it is your brakes which are the most importany part of your car.
I realize you don't know this but I have been working on my own vehicle. I try to read up as much as possible and do many basic things myself. However, I have found the easy stuff takes me much longer to do than what people report are "normal" times.

I don't want to screw up my brakes. I went to Moab Utah this year and there were some runs where brakes were very very important. So important an actual person went truck to truck touching each of our brake lines (44 Nissan trucks there that day) to make sure they were not leaking. On that run we needed every ounce of braking ability. I also saw a person in a Frontier who installed his own stainless brake lines. He didn't extend them enough and they pulled out and were leaking which is a bad thing when you are going down the steep parts.

Besides these reason I am not really mechanical. Computers are my speciality, I can fix your computer (or write a program) faster than I can change my own oil. I have plenty of wrenches and tools, just not a line-wrench. I don't mind picking one up if that is something I am going to do on a regular basis.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I dont even know what the hell a line wrench is, i just used an adjustable monkey wrench. Anyway if you dont want to do it then i totaly understand. Brakes are the most important part of a moving vehicle. Plus if you are as good of a programmer as you say you are, shelling out a hundred dollars to have them professionally done shouldnt be a problem for you.
 

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A line wrench looks like a 6 point boxed end with a notch taken out of it. It helps prevent stripping the soft brass flare nut. You can use a normal crecent wrench or open end wrench, but for the price of a line wrench it's good to have one. If I am not mistaken you can use the same wrench on the bleed nut which is also a soft metal and easily stripable.
 
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