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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Update: As of last night I got them free and new struts installed! What ended up working was lots of heat and a plumbers wrench to grip the rounded one. Then an another attempt with the compressor and muscle on the back one finally broke it free. Thank you all for the suggestions, hopefully this helps someone else later on!

Recently my stock passenger side strut broke off the lower mount and I got it home safe, purchased a new OME suspension kit to replace it with, and have been following all of the steps for front strut removal(and spraying all the hardware with pb blaster/wd40 rust release 2-3 times a day for the past week)( my X is a 2010 with 175k miles and lots of rust*facepalm*).

X is lifted, lower arm is supported, sway bar is out of the way, and now I'm struggling to get the top nuts off. I got one of three nuts on the top mount off, and the others won't budge. One of them I ended up rounding before I learned that I shouldn't use a 12 point wrench, and the other just will not move no matter how much force/leverage I can get within that space. I tried a nut/bolt remover socket but even with a hammer I couldn't get it tight enough to be efficient. I then went and rented a spring compressor, and within the space I have I couldn't get them set up well enough to a point where I could compress the spring to relieve enough pressure to let me loosen the non rounded nut. Any other ideas? Including pictures of the two problem nuts and the broken strut.
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If you're not keeping that strut, cut the stud with a sawzall or grinder with a cutoff wheel.
But since you're asking.... I assume you dont have these tools. Good investment in your time. If you work on any amount of rust, a sawzall, grinder and torch are a prerequisite.
Next time even a propane torch on the nut before trying it works well, just make sure you protect any plastic from the flame.
 

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Short of being able to weld on a larger nut, that stud bolt is beyond saving, so you're going to have to cut it off. You could try to cut just the nut and hope you don't mess up the threads. A nut splitter might be able to do that for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Try some heat.
If you're not keeping that strut, cut the stud with a sawzall or grinder with a cutoff wheel.
But since you're asking.... I assume you dont have these tools. Good investment in your time. If you work on any amount of rust, a sawzall, grinder and torch are a prerequisite.
Next time even a propane torch on the nut before trying it works well, just make sure you protect any plastic from the flame.
You’re correct in assuming I don’t have those two haha. Seeing as how I’m not keeping the strut or hardware I think cutting it sounds like the best bet from here, is there a sawzall you recommend? I’m seeing there’s quite a few options for them, is there a certain amount of power I’ll need to get these off do you think? Thanks for the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Short of being able to weld on a larger nut, that stud bolt is beyond saving, so you're going to have to cut it off. You could try to cut just the nut and hope you don't mess up the threads. A nut splitter might be able to do that for you.
I have a replacement for this strut anyways so the threads aren’t too much of a concern, maybe I should try the splitter before a saw of some sort? Or would you go straight to cutting it instead?
 

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I know some people don't like inexpensive tools, but for an occasional use sawzall I have had great results with a HF reciprocating saw, and they're often on sale even cheaper than this listed price.


You don't need a high amp tool for something small like that. Just be sure to invest in good blades... that makes a huge difference. A $20 saw with a $10 blade is more effective than a $200 saw with a $1 blade IMO.

I would just cut it since you aren't trying to save the stud. Just be careful you don't cut something you're not intending to.

Access to that area is a little tight, so a dremel, or nut splitter, or even a small hacksaw (again with a good blade) would be options too. There's usually not just one way to do it, but some ways will be slower and more work.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I know some people don't like inexpensive tools, but for an occasional use sawzall I have had great results with a HF reciprocating saw, and they're often on sale even cheaper than this listed price.


You don't need a high amp tool for something small like that. Just be sure to invest in good blades... that makes a huge difference. A $20 saw with a $10 blade is more effective than a $200 saw with a $1 blade IMO.

I would just cut it since you aren't trying to save the stud. Just be careful you don't cut something you're not intending to.
Sweet! That’s some of the info I was looking for, I’ll have to go grab one of these and some of the nicer blades and give it a go. Any other advice on the actual process of cutting these off?
 

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Stay as close as you can to the bottom of the nut, and watch for the kickback k if you punch the blade into something. If there is a tiny bit of the nut holding at the end you can probably just give the strut a yank and pry it off, or worst case hammer a chisel under it.
Definitely a decent metal blade. Anything that comes with it is garbage. The way I look at tools is, if its something I can see myself using more than the one job I need it for, I'll shop a decent quality one.
I had a cheapo sawzall before I bought my house and it did what I needed it to do, but when it came to doing demolition work, it wasn't up to the job and died on me.
 

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I edited my post after your quote, and I mentioned that access to that area is going to be tight, so there are some smaller tool options that could also work. Dremel, hacksaw, nut splitter for example.

If using the sawzall, take your time, work slowly and carefully so you don't damage your mount. Wear some eye and ear protection, and watch out for the saw to kick back if the front of the blade contacts anything.
 
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