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You might want to do some more research on P&P. I wouldn't recommend buying from them just from their customer service. Do a quick search on the forums and you will find plenty of answers but totally up to you on what you want to buy and what's available.
 

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User @ozotron has something similar, maybe he can chime in.

It looks like they might come into contact, but that lower part of the bumper is fairly flexible. The strap might rub against it but it will be relatively difficult to rip the bumper off or something.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
User @ozotron has something similar, maybe he can chime in.

It looks like they might come into contact, but that lower part of the bumper is fairly flexible. The strap might rub against it but it will be relatively difficult to rip the bumper off or something.
Ah ok.. for some reason when i was picturing it, I thought it sat farther back. This makes more sense. Thanks for the pic.

You might want to do some more research on P&P. I wouldn't recommend buying from them. Do a quick search on the forums and you will find plenty of answers.
Thanks, I've seen less than positive comments about this shop, but I was more interested about the concept. I cant invest in a big bumper but I'd like some recovery points. Rear is doable with a hitch reciever, but there's nothing for the front. I want trying to understand how it'd work.
 

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RockyMtnX (spelling?) used to produce them. he doesn't anymore but i was lucky to snag some when he still was. He puts a lot of thought into his products and they are built well. I have some pictures to help you envision it, but you can also search is old for sale page and there are plenty more. i'm sure a decent fabricator would have no problem reproducing something like this based off of pictures and quick measurements.








ADDED:
Link to old RockyMtnX sale page for reference.
http://www.thenewx.org/forum/78-members-product-sale/151818-mps-rockymtnx-front-recovery-brackets-stock-aftermarket-bumpers.html
 

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Hey everyone,


Sorry for a noob question, but if I added something like this: https://p-p-engineering.myshopify.com/collections/xterra-gen-ii-2005/products/2nd-gen-2005-nissan-xterra-frontier-front-bolt-on-recovery-points how would it work with the stock bumper? It seems like the shackles are pretty high up and any tow strap would interfere with the bumper.


Thanks
those look nice.. wish someone on this board would still make them.
These are also made by Dezert Runner Offroad, a SoCal business that is reliable. They don't have a website, give them a call or check their FB/IG



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If there were enough people interested in them in advance i could work with a guy to get some made perhaps. I know a local metal fabricator that I am in conversations with regarding sliders. i'm sure he could use mine as a template and fab a few up in advance
 

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These are also made by Dezert Runner Offroad, a SoCal business that is reliable. They don't have a website, give them a call or check their FB/IG



Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
I been in contact with Sarah, the person who runs the whole thing about this, we were able to talk and provide some measurements and just waiting on to see a prototype. Hopefully they are will bring these back in the community.
 

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If there were enough people interested in them in advance i could work with a guy to get some made perhaps. I know a local metal fabricator that I am in conversations with regarding sliders. i'm sure he could use mine as a template and fab a few up in advance
I'm interested. Put me on your list. I may be able to round up two more after I talk to them. See if your fabricator can give you a ballpark price.
 

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I been in contact with Sarah, the person who runs the whole thing about this, we were able to talk and provide some measurements and just waiting on to see a prototype. Hopefully they are will bring these back in the community.
Question for fabricators / welders / engineers out there... could a welded recovery point like this be as strong as the ones that are cut from one piece of thick angle iron?
 

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I been in contact with Sarah, the person who runs the whole thing about this, we were able to talk and provide some measurements and just waiting on to see a prototype. Hopefully they are will bring these back in the community.
Keep us updated. I'm definitely interested in a set to replace my dual tow hooks. I've seen there stuff on Facebook and it looks nice.

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Question for fabricators / welders / engineers out there... could a welded recovery point like this be as strong as the ones that are cut from one piece of thick angle iron?
If it's welded and designed correctly, yes. That said, anything is only as strong as it's weakest link. So, bolts, frame, welds, steel, all goes into play when a dynamic load or shock load is placed on it. Unfortunately, unless they are actually pull tested while mounted to a mock up frame, it'd be hard to know exactly what they will withstand. Although I'm sure some engineer with those magic computer programs that can simulate such things could give you a more accurate answer.

As for the cut from one piece variety, IMO they need a gusset welded in, and additional thickness where the shackle goes through (or along that whole side) to avoid the shackle twisting in the recovery point and damaging either the shackle or the recovery point.
 

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Question for fabricators / welders / engineers out there... could a welded recovery point like this be as strong as the ones that are cut from one piece of thick angle iron?

I asked a similar question before: "how do fabricators know that their offroad bumpers/recovery points can withstand loads applied" and I got the "well they just know that YxZ steel with ABC welds can withstand anything you'll ever throw at it".. which wasn't terribly convincing to be honest. I dont know anything about fabrication though.
 

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I asked a similar question before: "how do fabricators know that their offroad bumpers/recovery points can withstand loads applied" and I got the "well they just know that YxZ steel with ABC welds can withstand anything you'll ever throw at it".. which wasn't terribly convincing to be honest. I dont know anything about fabrication though.
When they are completely overbuilt like some are, then yes that's true.

For instance armored bumpers, a 3" wide X 1" thick recovery point welded fully around on the inside and outside = 16" of weld times approx. 1200 lbs of shear force per 1" of weld (engineer please provide more accurate #'s)= 19,200 lbs of force required to make anything start the thinking process of moving... couple that with attaching them directly to the frame mounting plates which many are, and it is more likely that you'll bend the frame or pull the bumper off the vehicle before the recovery point fails. As has been documented with people only using the front facing bolts on the frame horns.

Since what we are talking about are recovery points mounted underneath, now you are bringing in shear force on the bolts that hold it, and the angular forces that can and likely will be applied to it. And as stated above, if the recovery point is thick enough to avoid bending under stress, and bolted using grade 10.9 metric or grade 8 SAE hardware torqued to the correct amount for that bolt, it is once again more likely you'll bend the frame.

Anything can happen in a recovery, and correct rigging and forces need to be observed. Rest assured that the weakest link will be the point of failure.

I don't personally care for the "bolt underneath only" points (stock recovery hook excluded), because you are really only talking about the strength of the plate that's bolted to the frame, and as I see it (again, only my opinion, and I'm not an engineer), that's the most likely place you'd see a failure. Thus my statement of needing a gusset, which will apply force in a lateral motion across the mounting plate keeping the mounting plate more stable. I personally don't think a 1/4" thick angle iron is any where near sufficient, 1/2" thick yes with a gusset, 3/4" certainly, and 1" thick .....Duh!

Anyway, all of the above are just my opinions and spoken from years worth of building, but are backed by absolutely no real education or math other than the basic arithmetic that you see above which likely is wrong anyway.
 

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. . . f the recovery point is thick enough to avoid bending under stress, and bolted using grade 10.9 metric or grade 8 SAE hardware torqued to the correct amount for that bolt, it is . . . more likely you'll bend the frame. . . .

. . . I don't personally care for the "bolt underneath only" points (stock recovery hook excluded), because you are really only talking about the strength of the plate that's bolted to the frame, and as I see it . . . that's the most likely place you'd see a failure. Thus my statement of needing a gusset, which will apply force in a lateral motion across the mounting plate keeping the mounting plate more stable. I personally don't think a 1/4" thick angle iron is any where near sufficient, 1/2" thick yes with a gusset, 3/4" certainly, and 1" thick .....Duh!


The RockyMtnX front recovery brackets (NLA) are made from 1/2" thick A36 hot rolled mild steel angle.

One of the online calculators I found suggests that with a 58,000 psi ultimate tensile strength typical of A36 hot rolled mild steel, it would require a bending force of 19,285 lbs. [See V-Bending Force Calculator and https://www.onlinemetals.com/productguides/steelguide.cfm.]

Based upon the above, when coupled with the fact that an M12x1.25 class 10.9 bolt has a minimum shear strength of 1040 mPa (150839.2 psi), my feeble layman's mind is confident that my RockyMtnX front recovery brackets are plenty strong for their intended use without a gusset, whether in a straight or angled pull.

 
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