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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
They won’t do 300k or 500k miles and the electrical problems reputation is not a myth.
My 2006 Jeep Cherokee kept killing ignition coils, not immediately but frequently and dealer had to put it on rollers and investigate for several days… I was just around 100k.
same Cherokee, different time, crankshaft sensor overheated from clutch heat…operator error but still electrical.

There are so much more aftermarket parts and at much cheaper prices for jeeps its not even funny...
 

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Midnight Blue 2007 X
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They won’t do 300k or 500k miles and the electrical problems reputation is not a myth.
My 2006 Jeep Cherokee kept killing ignition coils, not immediately but frequently and dealer had to put it on rollers and investigate for several days… I was just around 100k.
same Cherokee, different time, crankshaft sensor overheated from clutch heat…operator error but still electrical.
that is true.. as well and lets not forge the jeep death wobble..
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Work continues. Rear doors fiberglass cutting.

Door overhang cutoff
Textile Road surface Rectangle Wood Grey

End flat piece cutoff, new end closed off
Automotive tire Wood Tread Rim Synthetic rubber

Stainless steel mounting half circle. Nuts will be welded on it. Bolts from outside.
Glove Wood Road surface Textile Sleeve

closeup of the new end. Still being fine tuned:
Wood Natural material Composite material Fashion accessory Metal
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
The end is in sight. Flares painted and available tomorrow. Then it’s still half circles needing welded nuts and taped to doors.

this dirt was from just 1/2 mile at 10mph, - few puddles along the way. Hoping for flares to make this much better
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire

Tire Wheel Car Land vehicle Vehicle

even if it looks like 6-9” would be needed to block front wheels at the bottom
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Motor vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
The 8+8 holes are etcher painted, etcher is what binds to bare metal. I won’t do anymore on top of etcher. I did the same with my front Shrockworks bumper. Just touch up bare metal.

These holes will be used to hold the front flares, with only rubber of the well nuts making contact with steel.

Back flares will mount to half circle steel pieces with welded on nuts…tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Spray painting would take a lot of prep and this is hidden.

Some interesting reading:

WHAT ARE ETCH PRIMERS?
Etch Primers are single pack metal primers formulated with a combination of resins to maximise adhesion to the various metal surfaces on which they may be used. A low level of phosphoric acid is present in these primers to etch the metal surface and improve adhesion. The coatings also contain zinc phosphate anti-corrosion pigment for steel surfaces. An important point to note is that they are formulated with low volume solids so that film builds can be kept low (10 - 15 m).

WHEN SHOULD THEY BE USED?
Etch Primers are intended for use as primers on new or relatively sound ferrous and non-ferrous metal surfaces. Examples of the types of surfaces on which these products would be used are light- weight tubing or thin sheet metal surfaces that cannot be prepared by abrasive blast cleaning. In such cases the combination hand/power tool abrasion and acid present in the primer generally provides sufficient adhesion to allow the use of thin film two-pack finishes. Severely corroded surfaces or those that can be prepared by abrasive blast cleaning would be better served by a surface- tolerant or conventional two-pack epoxy primer, as these products offer better long term corrosion protection than etch primers.

ADVANTAGES
The advantages of this type of product over other metal primers are as follows:
 Provides excellent adhesion over a variety of different metals.
Can be applied with minimal preparation (clean, degrease and abrade,
refer to data sheets).
Rapid cure, allowing overcoating with thin film topcoats in substantially less than 1 hour.
Zinc phosphate pigmentation offers some degree of inhibitive corrosion protection.

WHEN SHOULD THEY NOT BE USED?
When corrosion protection in coastal environments is required, etch primers are not adequate. A zinc-rich primer should be used as part of a heavy-duty, high build, two-pack system.
Etch primers work by acid etching the metal surface. Therefore they have little effect on previously painted surfaces (including precoated sheet steel such as Colorbond®). In fact, the phosphoric acid present in the etch primer may interfere with the adhesion of subsequent coatings, causing delamination.
Whilst the etch primer should be sprayed to ensure a thin, even film, the topcoat can be brushed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
When you make new holes, cover the bare metal with etcher. I use this. I spray it on cardboard and with mini brushes (30 for $3 from Walmart) I cover bare metal.
Tin Liquid Fluid Drink Tin can


that reading said to use degreaser too, I didn’t, I should have.

when I drilled holes in front bumper, up to 5/8” big, in 1/8” and 3/16” thick metal, I used the etcher too.

it is minimum work for rust prevention, more layers (primer and or topcoat) would be nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
The body shop let me down, "paint didn't stick" was their last word on Friday after having the flares for 16 days, they may be done on Monday...
So the project continues, will be delayed 3 weeks now because of my Colorado trip. Time to examine how my etcher on the holes prevents rust -- that's the only positive outcome here.

The lesson is: if you want something done within time constraints, do it yourself, even Pro shops have non-Pro moments at the worst time.

If this was powder coating, they could have fixed this, and probably start sooner than at the last minute, but fiberglass can't take the heat so it couldn't be powder coated.

This was supposed to be a "hands off" product use for me, no customization, just use existing product situation but all complicated.

Last piece of the puzzle is that I may still rub (the poorly designed fiberglass curves) in the rear wheel wells, so there may be more cutting needed after they are put on for the first time and flex is tested. There is an inch of gap where the rubbing could be.
 
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