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Was toying with the idea of a gas can mounted to the swingarm as I was fabbing my tire carrier last week, then I made a trip to camp and found that the only station in town is now closed. In an effort to avoid a 40 mile round trip (once back on pavement, never mind the offroad!) I need a spare can.

Need to be tall and skinny, what is out there for NATO style or other?

CARB sucks
 

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Scepter are nice, if you can find them ... the real-deal MFCs, not the hokey CARB compliant red cans. Anything non-CARB is going to be hard to find and (likely) expensive ... the most readily available option is probably going to be the ones Chris posted.
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Scepter is probably the 20 liter plastic gas can of choice these days (the milspec version). NATO cans are good if you can get them. (Both are now unattainable in California and illegal to ship here.) However, neither is "skinny," with the 20L Scepter cans measuring 18 1/2" L x 14" W x 6 1/2" D and 20L NATO cans measuring 18 1/4" H x 13 1/2" W x 6 1/2" D.

Another option is a Rotopax container, which is only 3" deep. I have mine mounted in my DepHep rack basket (2 ea., 2 gal. gas and 2 gal. water - each container measures 18.5" L x 13.5" W x 3" D). The 4 gal. gas container measures 34 1/2" L x 13 1/4" W x 3" D, which might fit the bill for "tall and skinny." They are available from Danny at XterraPerformance.com.

Or you can find a girl like the one in Chris Haynes's poster and you won't care if you run out of gas.
 

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However, neither is "skinny," with the 20L Scepter cans measuring 18 1/2" L x 14" W x 6 1/2" D and 20L NATO cans measuring 18 1/4" H x 13 1/2" W x 6 1/2" D.

Another option is a Rotopax container, which is only 3" deep.
color me confused. 20L is over 5 gal, so to store the same amount as the scepter you'll need > 2 rotopax.
 

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color me confused. 20L is over 5 gal, so to store the same amount as the scepter you'll need > 2 rotopax.
Scepter fuel cans are 20L/5.3 gal. and 6 1/2" deep. Rotopax fuel cans come in 2 gal. and 4 gal. sizes, both of which are only 3" deep. The OP's primary consideration was a "tall and skinny" fuel container rather than a specific capacity which is why I mentioned the 4 gal. Rotopax.




I bought 2 ea. of the 2 gal. fuel and water Rotopax containers because they are half the weight of a single 4 (or 5) gal. can when filled, therefore easier to get on and off my DepHep rack when I'm reaching up from the step on my sliders. Also, they don't leak at any angle and can be mounted horizontally, a feature more important to me in my particular application than the additional 1 gal. capacity of a single 5 gal. can.

That being said, I have a collection of 5 gal./20L US jerry cans, NATO cans and a couple of Scepter cans that I use with other rigs. They all serve a purpose.
 

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I have had a half dozen Scepter's and much prefer the Rotopax.

I use the Rotopax 3 gallon.

If you get Rotopax, be sure to get the yellow spout as the ECO spout that comes with is EPA mandated crap.

Toy Man
 

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I use the Rotopax 3 gallon.

If you get Rotopax, be sure to get the yellow spout. . .
I would have used the 3 gal. gas cans if Rotopax also manufactured a 3 gal. water can. Alas, they don't.

x2 on the yellow spout. I bought two extra with my water cans.
(Ironically, the markings on the spouts and retaining rings are "Scepter.")
 

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I bought 2 ea. of the 2 gal. fuel and water Rotopax containers because they are half the weight of a single 4 (or 5) gal. can when filled, therefore easier to get on and off my DepHep rack when I'm reaching up from the step on my sliders. Also, they don't leak at any angle and can be mounted horizontally, a feature more important to me in my particular application than the additional 1 gal. capacity of a single 5 gal. can.
X4 on the Rotopax.

Especially for the reasons highlighted above. Lighter, and more easily handled (pun intended) with all the grip options. This also makes them and easier bungee/tie down on the roof if you don't want to expense the Rotopax mounts.

Recently running 130 miles of the Mojave Road (May 2014) with my 4 gallon, and two three gallon RP's with no problem...bungee/shock corded to the roof rack and a terry towel underneath. No leaks, no hits, no errors.

Filling in Laughlin...with the Rotopax neatly tetrised' flat on the back of the roof.


SIDEBAR: Originally purchased the spare tire carrier mount, and ran the Mojave Road in 2013 as a test for that Rotopax mount system, with the filled 3 gallon pax.



Experienced mild slipping of the band/strap, but the worst case was the slow loosening of my Shrock (insert Surf & Snow comment here) swing arm bushing.

No leaks though, so good on the Rotopax mounted vertically.

So, now off of the back on onto the roof for and extra 120 kicks of smileage.

EDIT:

FYI: Toting and mounting gasoline/water/diesel "The Rotopax Way" is very efficient (IMM)..but not for the faint of wallet.

The 4 gallon can set me back $100, new to me from a forum member.

The 3 gallon pax plus the strap and tire mounts set me back $400+ dollars. The 3 gallon cans alone were about $85 shipped, each.
 

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laying two larger rotopax on a roof rack is appealing, as i don't need any more weight hanging off the back of my bumper, but the price is not. maybe someday a group buy will cut the price.

-SM-
 

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On a recent trip to Arizona Strip I carried 3 three gallon and 1 two gallon RotoPax 'cans' laid horizontally in my DIY recessed roof rack. Used web straps to secure and everything worked great.

Toy Man
 

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Old School......

The NATO can is based on pre-WWII design



English: German Container for 20 liters of fuel. left: former container, right: Wehrmacht-Einheitskanister of 1941, manufacturers Nirona

A jerrycan (also written as jerry can or jerrican) was originally a robust fuel container made from pressed steel. It was designed in Germany in the 1930s for military use to hold 20 litres (5.3 U.S. gal) of fuel. The development of the jerrycan was a significant improvement on earlier designs, which required tools and funnels to use. Today similar designs are used for fuel and water containers, some of which are also produced in plastic. The designs usually emulate the original steel design and are still known as jerrycans.

Wiki page is a great read..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerrycan
 
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