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My stupid, was pulling a few stumps after a storm here, just tossed the strap on the tow hitch had to bump it a couple of times, very light but enough with the drop hitch to put to much stress on the bumper and ended up bending the bumper ever so slightly. Now the swing arm for the tire carrier is hitting the top of the hitch receiver. Balls! There are two crimps under the bumper, probably some heat and a hammer to smack those back in while leveraging down on the hitch to bend it back? Thoughts? Figure after I beat the powder off I can bed line the bottom of the bumper to cover the metal.
 

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Could you post up some pictures? That would probably help us see exactly what is wrong with it!
 

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That sucks...:(

A really long piece of 2" receiver tube as a lever while heating may make it easy to pop back into shape.
When using a receiver as an anchor for a tow strap I always insert the strap into the receiver then put the pin through to hold it. That way it's a straight pull on the receiver pin not a leveraged pull on a drop hitch.

I too want to see pics of this. I am considering one of these rear bumpers for mine but not if its weak as a tow device. I tow a boat that weighs 3200 lbs and a camper that weighs 3400 lbs. I would hate to tweak my bumper just by doing a panic stop. How much of a drop do you have?
 

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I too want to see pics of this. I am considering one of these rear bumpers for mine but not if its weak as a tow device. I tow a boat that weighs 3200 lbs and a camper that weighs 3400 lbs. I would hate to tweak my bumper just by doing a panic stop. How much of a drop do you have?
Completely different scenario. In a panic stop, your X and the trailer are both traveling at the same speed, and because they are coupled together slow down at the same speed with little to know changes in the forces at the hitch/bumper.

Yanking on a stump, the hitch/bumper is seeing a large, sudden change in force. Translated through the lever (moment arm) of a drop hitch, it is enough to deform.

If you were sitting at a light, brakes locked, with a RIGID trailer and you got rear ended, you would see the same sudden change in force. In reality, your brakes will give and your trailer will crumple from the impact.
 

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That sucks...:(

A really long piece of 2" receiver tube as a lever while heating may make it easy to pop back into shape.
When using a receiver as an anchor for a tow strap I always insert the strap into the receiver then put the pin through to hold it. That way it's a straight pull on the receiver pin not a leveraged pull on a drop hitch.

Genius. Will keep that in mind.
 

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Completely different scenario. In a panic stop, your X and the trailer are both traveling at the same speed, and because they are coupled together slow down at the same speed with little to know changes in the forces at the hitch/bumper.

Yanking on a stump, the hitch/bumper is seeing a large, sudden change in force. Translated through the lever (moment arm) of a drop hitch, it is enough to deform.

If you were sitting at a light, brakes locked, with a RIGID trailer and you got rear ended, you would see the same sudden change in force. In reality, your brakes will give and your trailer will crumple from the impact.
You have obviously never been in a panic stop with a heavy trailer and hydraulic surge brakes. :iconbiggrin: They by no means slow down at the same speed in a panic stop. When you jump on the brakes, first the trailer SLAMS in to the hitch with it's full weight and velocity, THEN the surge brakes activate slowing the trailer. I bent a 2" drop hitch made from 3/4" steel about 20 degrees down from vertical two years ago when a coffee truck (panel van) decided to go from 60 mph to zero to make a left turn in front of my Gen I. The forces involved in a panic stop are large! Also due to the fact you should tow with the towed vehicle slightly pitched down to help eliminate sway, which means a drop hitch in most cases, you now have a lever acting to twist the receiver when the brakes are jumped on. If the Shrock bumper was not designed for these forces it will twist.
 

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Completely different scenario. In a panic stop, your X and the trailer are both traveling at the same speed, and because they are coupled together slow down at the same speed with little to know changes in the forces at the hitch/bumper.
This is not exactly true. Especially if the trailer is not equipped with brakes. In a panic braking situation, especially if the trailer does not have any brakes, the trailer is going to want to maintain its forward travel and resist being stopped by the tow vehicle. This deceleration will create a force that is acting in the trailers direction of travel at the hitch. Consider Newton's 1st law. I do agree though that this force will likely not be as great as the one you would experience from the stump pulling scenario.
 
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