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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I know that I posted a similar thread yesterday, but in the mids of modifing my X I measured my battery and realized that I could fit a heavy duty battery that has 1100CCA instead of 650, They are both 12 volt batteries but I notice the battery that was previously installed was a "calcium oxide" battery and Ive never heard of this spicific kind. My question is do nissans require a certain type of battery (which I doubt because ive never really heard of that) Or is it okay to installed any battery that has a 12V regulation?
 

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My question for you is, why are you trying to double your CC's? Do you have issues with the cranking now?

Personally, if you are not having issues with the starting of the engine (ie the use of 650cc to turn over the engine) then I would suggest you focus more on Ah (amp hours). Look for a battery with higher Ah at a high Rate.

Let me explain:

The Amp Hours are how many amps discharge in a specific time to bring the battery to zero, think MPG. Back before they standardized MPGs car dealers could market a car to get 42 miles to the gallon, (yeah! At 25mph and on a down slope). Same goes for batteries. They standardized it (loosely) to how many amps are discharged to zero for a length of time. (Usually 10 or 20hrs)

Most starting batteries are rated at a 10Hr rate. This is due to the face that we use them 'hard' when starting or cranking a chunk of metal to running speed. (That 650 Cold Cranking Amps)

Deep Cycle batteries are usually rated with 20Hrs. These can be run much longer with lower loads such as a fridge or lights.

So, say you found a Group 31 (physical size) Deep cycle rated at 105amps @20Hrs. That would mean the battery could last 20Hrs with a 5amp load running. (A set of Hella fogs is about 4.5amps)

So to summarize. Measure out the battery area and get anything above 650CC. (That's more than enough), BUT start looking at the different types of batteries and what their Amp Hours are rated at. (But verify their amp rate)


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Im not trying to double my CCA Thats just The average way and the most labelled Spec on the battery at least heavy duty batteries. I know these alliance heavy duty batteries are soild though, I load tested fairly abused battery at 750CCA charged it for a day and left a Driving light hooked to it for 36 hours and it was still on, dim but still lit. Im not sure on the exact specs, I looked them up on their website but they only provide CCA. I know these batteires take loads of abuse and keep working and I could forget my head lights on for days and still crank the vehicle which works for when im camping and running my stereo and all my other electronics. Its not just doubling the CCA Its simply just the capacity instead of putting in 2 batteires in.
 

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Just education. You are correct that they may just use the CC's as their point of ref. Most people are familiar with the CC's. In this case, its better to look at the Ah if you can find it.

To answer your original question though, you can put what ever 'type' of batter in there since you are setting up a single battery system. The issue becomes mixing battery types in a dual system. Its defiantly the way to go if you are trying to avoid the dual battery setup. Larger battery = more life out of it.

What brand and Group are you looking at?
 

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I think the BC is British Columbia not Baha California.

I know that when I lived on Chicago's super cold south side and on Denver's east side I wanted every cold cranking amp I could beg, borrow, or steal on a frozen morning. There were times where the battery on my car struggled.

Cold Cranking amps of a starter battery give an indication on the internal resistance which limits the power available across the high current/low resistance load of the starter motor.

Amp hours is an indication of a different higher resistance lower current load. How long a given battery can supply current across a 20 hour discharge rate - but caution, some battery manufacturers don't follow the standard 20 hour discharge rate.

A starter battery is designed for high current bursts of energy where a deep cycle battery tends to be designed for a longer slower discharge. If you go with an Absorbed Glass Battery make sure you look for a high discharge or high amp and look at the CCA rating.
 
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