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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if any of you girls are running limiting straps?

I'd like a picture of were the top clevis is welded or bolted through the frame. Going to add some to my rig but not 100 percent confident on were to mount it, any help is appreciated

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So what are the benefits of limiting straps? Does it just limit the suspension travel so nothing breaks or what? Sorry for my lack of knowledge but I'm sure I'm not the only one :)
 

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I've seen SAS guys use them in front and central portion if the axle, to reduce COG displacement during aggressive uphill climbs.

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GPD,
Your supposition is correct. Limit straps prevent other suspension components from binding, or worse, breaking. The biggest reason for using limit straps is to ensure that the shock tube is not pulled apart during quick rebounds of the damper. They are not designed nor intended to be the component that stops suspension travel at full droop. They can also serve to prevent CV or other drive line binding in independent suspensions. In properly designed off road suspensions, maximum travel can be achieved when the drive line binding and shock extension reach their limits simultaneously, and a limit strap is used to stop downward travel appropriately. It is also important to remember that because the limit straps are loaded dynamically, they stretch approximately 1" for every 12" of strap.
 

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" They are not designed nor intended to be the component that stops suspension travel at full droop. "

What is used to limit travel at full droop?
 

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I've seen SAS guys use them in front and central portion if the axle, to reduce COG displacement during aggressive uphill climbs.

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Sorry buddy, your thinking about when they connect their winch to the axle tubes and suck it in. This compresses the suspension some keeping it from unloading too much when trying to skinny it up a hard climb.


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Offroad Gorrilla,
I should qualify that statement with the following (as always, things are usually far more nuanced than a simple post can communicate):

In the world of offroad racing, limit straps perform this function, because the rebound damping, spring rates, vehicle velocity, and terrain combined with significant unsprung weight (beadlocked 15" Walker Evans race wheels and 35" Baja tires are rather heavy. I worked in a pit crew for a Class 1 race buggy a few years ago and thought I'd get a hernia moving those wheels around all day, not to mention the boxed lower A-arms adding significant weight themselves) will load the suspension with thousands of pounds of dynamic force, which the shock cannot stop effectively for very long.

Without limit straps, bump stops can be used between the upper and lower control arms, between the lower control arm and a frame member, or nothing, as is the case with most road-going vehicles. OEMs do not really expect their vehicles to be hammering through the desert at speed, or become airborne, so the vicious cycling of the vehicle suspension is not anticipated. Even in rock crawling, the wheel travel rate relative to the vehicle's center of gravity is fairly low, because the vehicle is not moving very quickly. The largest loading of suspension is when a wheel comes down, which is in compression, and the shock absorber has built-in bump-stops for compression, and/or bump-stops on the suspension components. When a wheel comes off the ground, the suspension isn't cycled very quickly, and the forces applied to the suspension come from gravity and the spring only. In desert racing, the terrain itself is driving the suspension's motion far more than gravity or the spring rate alone would, and the response of the spring-mass-damper system to this oscillatory input function can drive its amplitude response more than the DC application and removal of forces on the wheel.

So as a rule, if you want to ensure your expensive shock absorbers and CV axles will survive abusive suspension cycles, limit straps are a good idea. If you want to compete in King of Hammers, they're a necessity.
 

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I'll probably be adding them to my TS package.
Let full droop & determine where CV bind is / just prior to full coilover extension.

Interesting note, I was unaware that Nissan CV's have more operating angle than Cardones? Might be changing those to Nissan cv's and carry a cardone as a spare....
 

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Samuel313 thanks for the info.

Not sure you answered my question though.

If someone wants to limit their downward suspension travel to avoid unwanted contact of suspension/drive components what would they use?
 

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Sorry to threadjack here, but it seems most of the guys posting in this thread have encountered cardone axles. I bought a pair to replace my stock ones, and I couldnt for the life of me get the cardone axle to fit in my damn diff. I wrestled with it for a while and said screw it, and reinstalled the original axle. It went right in. Anyone else have issues installing the cardone axles?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
No issues on axles for me.

I don't have binding issues but at full droop my upper control arm uni ball is what is stopping my down travel . I want the straps to stop the down travel right before the uca is about to. I've blown a few uni balls because of this

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Offroad Gorilla,
Some aftermarket UCAs come with bump-stops that contact the coil bucket. That would be considered a device that limits downward travel and avoids metal-on-metal contact of the suspension components. I also mentioned bump stops between control arms and bump-stops between control arms and frame members, as those also prevent excessive downward travel.

To answer your question directly, either limit straps or bump-stops would be used to limit downward travel.

Limit straps are often easier to install than bump-stops because they function in tension and can be mounted almost anywhere in the wheel well.

Designs using bump-stops are more difficult because one needs to consider the stress on the control arms (the bump-stops can't be mounted as far along the control arm as limit straps, and thus apply significantly more force at a single point) the deflection of the bump-stop itself, and the limitation on mounting locations to achieve the desired function.

Many vehicles simply use the shock itself as the limiting factor, despite their inherent weakness in tension at full droop.

SteadyHigh,
That's too bad. May I ask what UCAs and shocks you are using? It seems like the shock is too long for the UCA, even if both are better than OEM.
 

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I'll probably be adding them to my TS package.
Let full droop & determine where CV bind is / just prior to full coilover extension.

Interesting note, I was unaware that Nissan CV's have more operating angle than Cardones? Might be changing those to Nissan cv's and carry a cardone as a spare....
I am using bumpcans for upward travel stops. See pictures
Limit straps for no binding at full droop. See pictures

originally I had Cardones which needed the limit straps, but now with OEM Nissan's We have adjusted them for more drop since there is not binding. The new limit is just before colibucket contact. I also have used OEMs Nissan axles for trail spares and will sell my set of lightly used Cardones to a good home.
 
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