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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why can't we drive with our 4.x4 High on dry pavement while with other trucks, say 4Runner, you can? What is different that doesn't allow us to drive in 4x4 on dry pavement. I'm not saying that I want to, but I'm just wondering why we can't....THANKS!
 

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Most part time 4wd systems you should not drive on dry pavement as the system can bind. AWD systems you can run in 4wd all the time as it works a bit different (all 4 tires are not usually turning all the time).

I am not sure what type of system the 4Runner has, but I bet it's not selectable 4wd.
 

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muzikman said:
Most part time 4wd systems you should not drive on dry pavement as the system can bind. AWD systems you can run in 4wd all the time as it works a bit different (all 4 tires are not usually turning all the time).

I am not sure what type of system the 4Runner has, but I bet it's not selectable 4wd.
Your wrong there. I have a 2003 4runner with the V6. It will run in 2HI and 4HI. It also has a low range. It has the torsen transfer case which allows you to run in full time 4 wheel drive on the highway as well as lock it up when needed off road.

I sure wish my X had that transfer case.
 

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Well, that is why I said "I am not sure". But what you are saying is that although it is selectable it does have an AWD selection as well.

I think my brothers GMC is like that too.
 

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The 4Runner has a center differential and the Xterra does not. The center diff allows the front and rear axles to rotate at different speeds, thus no binding when you corner. If you lock the center diff on the 4runner and drive it on pavement you will notice the binding, expecially backing up in a turn, just like the Xterra or any other 4x4 without a center diff. If your veh has a center diff, and you don't lock it, feel free to drive in all wheel drive where ever and when ever.
 

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Toyota has some weird 4wd options, although I'm not sure if they have anything to do with cost.

The 2007 V6 4Runner, for example, comes with what they call 'multi-mode' 4wd, which is selectable full-time 4wd, i.e. you can be in 2wd, or in 4wd with an open center diff, or 4wd with a locked center diff. The more expensive V8 only comes with the full-time 4wd.

Even stranger, the new Toyota FJ Cruiser is full-time 4wd if you get the 6 speed manual, while automatic FJs don't have a center diff and are part-time 4wd only, so the cheaper FJ's are the ones with full-time 4wd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so does our 4x4 drive system distribute power evenly to all 4 tires or is there like a 60/40 split with 60% to the rear adn 40% to the front? Which in a sense is better for OR??
 

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I would think it would be a 50/50 split since its true 4wd..

My Silverado has an Auto setting that will run unlocked in 4wd until slippage is detected... its pretty cool to get out in a wet pasture and put it in auto and make it slip.. first you feel the locker in the rear catch then the front wheels engage.. pretty sweet setup ya might say.
 
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